'Magical Malta,' the Tiny Mediterranean Wonder

By Bartruff, Dave | The World and I, September 2013 | Go to article overview

'Magical Malta,' the Tiny Mediterranean Wonder


Bartruff, Dave, The World and I


Though just a dot in the vast waters of the Mediterranean, the tiny island republic of Malta thoroughly surprises and entertains a growing audience of visitors today.

Although its stage is small, just three tiny islands, historians date its civilization back 7,000 years! Its prehistoric megalithic temple of Hagar Qim, they say, predates the Pyramids of Egypt and England's Stonehenge.

It is also a landmark of Biblical Christianity. Here, St. Paul was shipwrecked and miraculously rescued, thus enabling him to bring the salvation message of Jesus Christ to the islanders.

The island republic's capital, Valletta, can also boast as being the largest walled city in all of Europe and has been distinguished as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Its Port of Valletta, and the Maltese capital, is a favorite stopover on Mediterranean cruise itineraries welcoming over a million passengers a year, more than twice its local population of nearly 400,000.

On shore, tourist resources are plentiful and tours are professionally run enabling visitors to experience all the islands' many amazing landmarks.

The cosmopolitan destination is composed of three islands; Malta, (capital home and the largest), rugged Gozo, and pristine Comino are in the heart of the Mediterranean commanding access not only to Europe but also North Africa and the Middle East. Thus it's always been an ancient cultural crossroads.

### Therefore the Maltese language is a m-lange of diverse influences. Derived from Arabic, it is the only Semitic language written with the Roman alphabet.

Phoenicians and Romans, Normans and Swabians, French and English have all left their marks here. In fact, historians say Malta's first inhabitants were from nearby Sicily and were originally cave dwellers.

Later arrivals from parts unknown followed from mid 3000 to 2000 B.C. and built the megalithic Maltese temples that predate England's Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids.

It is now known that North African Carthage ruled Malta during the third to first centuries B.C. Roman domination followed, but in the 4th century with the split in the empire, Malta became attached to the Byzantine Empire.

In the 9th century, Arabs captured and occupied the islands. Norman Crusader knights ousted them in AD 1090. Still other invasions followed.

In 1530, the three islands were given in perpetuity to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem by the Holy Roman Emperor. There was just a single condition, that a peregrine Maltese falcon be gifted annually to the sovereign in return.

The pope's own master architect designed the knights' island fortress of Valletta. It was named after the Grand Master of the Knights, Jean de la Valletta. Construction was completed just in time: in 1565, as the citadel was about to be besieged by the Ottomans under the command of Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent and his 30,000-man amphibious force. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Magical Malta,' the Tiny Mediterranean Wonder
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.