Peter Krembs: Consultant, Center for Character-Based Leadership Minneapolis, Minnesota

By Gaul, Patty | T&D, December 2013 | Go to article overview

Peter Krembs: Consultant, Center for Character-Based Leadership Minneapolis, Minnesota


Gaul, Patty, T&D


Peter Krembs has nearly 40 years of experience in leadership development and change leadership. He specializes in the unique issues found in professional and expert-based cultures, including science, technology, IT, financial services, and healthcare.

He was a faculty member of GE leadership development courses in the United States, Europe, India, and Asia for more than 20 years.

WHAT KIND OF WORK DO YOU DO WITH THE CENTER FOR CHARACTER-BASED LEADERSHIP?

We address the issues of balance and effective energy management, personal responsibility, and healthy boundaries. We try to help people explore not just what they can do as leaders, or what they personally want to do as leaders, but also to answer this question: "What is the most effective use of myself in a leadership role?"

By using peer coaching groups to strengthen character "muscles," there is a common language that develops around character--and we help leaders learn from each other's experiences about the dilemmas, tensions, and challenges of character issues. We feel that people learn best from peers, once the relationships are developed.

WHAT ARE A FEW OF THE CHALLENGES FACING LEADERS TODAY THAT YOU DID NOT SEE 20 YEARS AGO?

I started doing this work straight out of graduate school in 1974, and we really focused on leadership development in terms of the immediate reporting team.

Today we have nimble, constantly changing structures where leadership is about so much more than just focusing on the "up and down" vertical hierarchy. It is about understanding your sphere of influence in all directions. We are better today, I think, at grasping how things get done much better through healthy relationships than through firmly established role authority alone.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE THE NECESSARY TRAITS OF EXCEPTIONAL LEADERS IN TECHNICAL ORGANIZATIONS?

Mastery in specific specialty areas of science, engineering, legal, or finance requires years of specialty training and experience. …

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Peter Krembs: Consultant, Center for Character-Based Leadership Minneapolis, Minnesota
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