Insipid Enda Left Nothing to Linger in the Memory; ANALYSIS

Daily Mail (London), December 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

Insipid Enda Left Nothing to Linger in the Memory; ANALYSIS


Byline: by Niamh Lyons POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT

STATE of the Nation speeches tend to be made in a time of crisis. They are a warning shot, used to prepare the ground for tough times ahead. They are deployed to convince voters that short-term pain can lead to long-term reward.

Jack Lynch's commitment that the Government 'could no longer stand by' in 1969 over the worsening violence in the North was a memorable speech.

In 1980, Charles Haughey told the public we were living 'way beyond our means' in a broadcast indelibly stamped on the public memory.

But can anyone remember a key line from Enda Kenny's first State of the Nation address in 2011, or a stand-out phrase from last night? There was no ultimate soundbite.

No clear conviction that the nation is through the worst of the crisis. No sense among the carefully crafted 941 words that we are back in control of our own destiny.

So why did Enda Kenny resort to a formal national broadcast to get his point across on this occasion? If his last State of the Nation was meant as an 'introduction to austerity' as he locked the country into three more years of fiscal penury, then perhaps this was the parole board hearing.

But why not take the credit for sending the Troika packing? Staring down the barrel of a camera is unnerving for people on both sides of the screen and it does not stimulate confidence among those you address.

OF course the need to control the message is a high priority for those around Enda Kenny. They are the ones around him who cringe when he is pummelling kidneys, handing-out high-fives and picking-up toddlers for a photo opportunity.

The fact is, he's good at that stuff. Believe it or not, he's funny and sharp-witted in real life.

But the personable side of the Taoiseach does not come across when he is reading from autocue in the staid set-up of his office in Government Buildings.

After years of avoiding live debates and shying away from setpiece interviews, it is unclear whether this is a personal choice or a political strategy.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Insipid Enda Left Nothing to Linger in the Memory; ANALYSIS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.