The Thrill of Shining New Light on Classical Music

The Evening Standard (London, England), December 16, 2013 | Go to article overview

The Thrill of Shining New Light on Classical Music


Byline: Jude Kelly

FEW of the thousands of conversations about cultural events every day -- at parties, on the web, in pubs and restaurants -- mention contemporary classical music. Rarely is a composer or conductor asked for their views on politics or current affairs. They're simply not seen as a relevant voice.

And yet music is subject to the same social forces and political upheavals as other art forms. It has had to bend under dictators, fire up its weapons against tyranny and join forces with social movements to reflect voices for change. Yet it has found itself out in the cold, on the margins of cultural awareness. Why have small or niche audiences been accepted as the norm, so becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy? Much contemporary music is difficult; to the ear steeped in classical harmony it can even be painful. With so little help offered to audiences to come to terms with it, who can blame them for staying away? And without curious audiences, it's hard for young composers to be bold.

To some extent, those of us who stage classical music must take some of the blame for keeping the concert hall a place of 19th-century ritual: the formal dress of the orchestras, the reverential atmosphere, the mystique of the maestro. Apart from programme notes, often academic and dense, there has never been a consistent, open-hearted commitment to support understanding not just what you're about to hear but why it sounds the way it does.

In art appreciation, context is critical. The visual arts, through analysis of their social and cultural background by education, commentary and wonderful mass media events such asRobert Hughes's Shock of the New, have regularly had their context explained. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Thrill of Shining New Light on Classical Music
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.