No Privacy Behind the Wheel: Your Car Might Be Spying; Data Collection Raises Concerns

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 8, 2014 | Go to article overview

No Privacy Behind the Wheel: Your Car Might Be Spying; Data Collection Raises Concerns


Byline: Phillip Swarts, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Consumers' locations and other data are at risk of being leaked by companies that run automobile navigation services like GPS, a report has found, putting the national debate on privacy behind the wheel.

Despite telling consumers they are collecting the information and seeking consent, companies do not always disclose what information is collected and how it is used. Companies are also inconsistent when it comes to giving drivers the ability to delete their information.

The companies' privacy practices were, in certain instances, unclear, which could make it difficult for consumers to understand the privacy risks that may exist, said a report from the Government Accountability Office, Congress' watchdog arm.

Privacy advocacy groups are concerned that location data can be used to track where consumers are, which can in turn be used to steal their identity, stalk them, or monitor them without their knowledge, the investigative agency said.

Anytime you're collecting data about consumers, there's a need to be aware of what the companies are doing and the implications of holding that data, said Alan Butler, an attorney with the Electronic Privacy Information Center. It's an issue people need to be aware of. We haven't heard yet of any major breaches or major violations of consumer rights.

The increasing use of communication and location-based computers and gadgets in cars - called telematics - in some cases has left the government scrambling to keep up.

Currently, no comprehensive federal privacy law governs the collection, use, and sale of personal information by private-sector companies, the GAO said. While legislative proposals aimed at protecting the privacy of location data by mobile devices and navigation systems have been introduced by members of Congress, none of the proposals have been enacted.

The GAO looked at 10 companies involved in the automobile industry, including manufacturers: Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Nissan and Toyota, GPS producers Garmin and TomTom, and navigation developers Google Maps and Telenav.

All 10 companies tell drivers they are collecting information, but some don't disclose what information they are collecting or why, which could allow for unlimited data collection and use, the GAO said. Likewise, all the companies tell drivers the information is shared with third parties but don't always give a reason.

Some don't give drivers a choice to delete their personal data, a necessary step in maintaining privacy, Mr. Butler said. Keeping records of the data could create a repository of personal information that could be accessed easily by hackers or by law enforcement personnel against the driver's wishes.

Obviously this data, if it was breached, could reveal a great deal of information about individual drivers, he said, adding that tracking someone's car could reveal where they live, work and worship, among other things. …

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No Privacy Behind the Wheel: Your Car Might Be Spying; Data Collection Raises Concerns
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