Japan's Emerging Militarism Is Serious Threat

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 12, 2014 | Go to article overview

Japan's Emerging Militarism Is Serious Threat


Byline: GUEST VIEWPOINT By Song Nai Rhee

On Dec. 26, Abe Shinzo, Japan's prime minister, committed an unpardonable sin in the eyes of 1.5 billion Asians - including many peace-loving Japanese.

Against stern warnings, Abe paid his respects at the Yasukuni Shrine where 14 Class-A war criminals - including Gen. Tojo Hideki, who ordered the Pearl Harbor attack - are memorialized along with Japan's 2.5 million war-dead.

The Yasukuni Shrine is also the home of the Yushukan, a war museum designed, among other purposes, to glorify Japan's imperialistic aggression during World War II and to portray Japan's brutal invasions as a holy war intended to liberate Asia from the Americans and Europeans.

Abe Shinzo's act has drawn swift condemnation.

China's Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang stated, "China is enraged over Japanese leaders' wantonly trampling upon the sensitivity of the people of Asia victimized by Japan during World War II as well as over their arrogant defiance against justice and human conscience."

Korea's Donga News stated: "Abe ... has thrust a nail through the heart of Koreans!" And a South Korean government official said, "Abe has chopped off his own foot."

Particularly significant is an editorial statement in Chosun.com, a prominent South Korean Internet news site on Dec. 27, saying that "Abe's provocation" shows that the peace-bound Japan of the past no longer exists.

This point was echoed on the same day in a New York Times editorial: "Abe's ultimate goal is to rewrite Japan's pacifist Constitution ... which restricts the right to go to war."

Largely unnoticed by the American public, Abe Shinzo and Japan's conservative government have been quietly but resolutely seeking to remilitarize Japan.

Abe is a grandson of Kishi Nobusuke, who was Tojo Hideki's handpicked industry/commerce minister and was imprisoned as a Class-A war crime suspect after the war.

Apparently, young Abe received a good dose of nationalistic brainwashing from his grandfather, for he has never acknowledged any wrongdoing by Japan during World War II, but has sought to justify Japan's imperialistic invasions as "Japan's holy war of liberation of Asia from Western colonialists." And he believes that now is the time for Japan to free itself from the American-imposed "peace Constitution," which forbids Japan from establishing regular army, navy, and air force and from ever settling international disputes with military means.

Aso Taro, Japan's deputy prime minister, has even suggested that the Japanese government should learn from Hitler and the Nazis in changing Japan's constitution "stealthily and secretly overnight with no one knowing what is happening. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Japan's Emerging Militarism Is Serious Threat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.