Making an Impression: Korean American Lee, Inspired by Growing Up in Racially Tense '90S LA and with Help from Famous Mentors like Henry Louis Gates Jr., Is Making a Splash in the Academy as an African-American Scholar

By Watson, Jamal Eric | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, January 2, 2014 | Go to article overview

Making an Impression: Korean American Lee, Inspired by Growing Up in Racially Tense '90S LA and with Help from Famous Mentors like Henry Louis Gates Jr., Is Making a Splash in the Academy as an African-American Scholar


Watson, Jamal Eric, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


Dr. Julia Sun-Joo Lee has gotten used to the strange looks that sometimes greet her on the first day of class. "My students may initially be surprised to see me in the classroom," says Lee, who teaches African-American Literature at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

"But I always say that African-American literature is not just limited to African-Americans. It is American literature and is so much a part of the history of this country. It shouldn't be ghettoized."

Lee, who is Korean American, earned her Ph.D. in English and American Language and Literature from Harvard University in 2008 and credits Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. with piquing her interest in African-American and transatlantic literature.

"[Gates] is able to make history come alive," Lee says of her famous mentor, who currently serves as the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and founding director of Harvard's Hutchins Center for African and African-American Research. "He is engaging and charming and has so much enthusiasm in the classroom."

Growing up in Los Angeles, Lee developed a strong interest in race relations early on. "I think I always had a sense of racial consciousness."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

After the 1991 police beating of Rodney King, she watched as her parents--who immigrated to the U.S. from South Korea in the 1960s--struggled to protect their liquor store against wanton violence from the looters who took to the streets to protest the incident.

Coming from a mono-racial upbringing, Lee says that her parents quickly evolved and came to understand racial strife and tensions in this country.

Desperate to return back West after earning her bachelor's from Princeton University in 1998, Lee spent several years teaching 19th century British literature to high school students before she decided to pursue a graduate degree at Harvard.

"Part of me wanted to learn more," Lee says of the reason why she decided to enroll in a doctoral program at Harvard. "I felt like I didn't know enough and I always wanted to teach and pursue my own research."

From 2008 until 2011, Lee was a visiting assistant professor of English at Loyola Marymount University where she taught a variety of courses ranging from first-year composition to African-American literature. In 2010, Oxford University Press published The American Slave Narrative and the Victorian Novel, a book that has been praised for its detailed examination on the American slave narrative's influence on the Victorian novel in the years between the British Abolition Act and the American Emancipation Proclamation. …

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