"Meeting Mondays" Boosts Staff Nurses' Committee Participation: Designating One Day a Month for Meetings Increased Frontline Nurses' Involvement in Committees and Councils

By Drouillard, Jeanne | American Nurse Today, January 2014 | Go to article overview

"Meeting Mondays" Boosts Staff Nurses' Committee Participation: Designating One Day a Month for Meetings Increased Frontline Nurses' Involvement in Committees and Councils


Drouillard, Jeanne, American Nurse Today


After our hospital set out on the Pathway to Excellence[R] Program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), leaders realized staff nurses were only minimally participating in committees and councils--the forums for making decisions about nursing practice and the work environment. Usually, just four or five staff nurses attended each meeting, even though our hospital culture encouraged participation.

While many of our nurses agreed it was important to be active in shared governance committees and councils, they had difficulty leaving their units and patients to attend meetings, even for an hour. Bay Park Community Hospital/ProMedica Health System in Oregon, Ohio, is small, with just 70 beds. So finding additional staff to cover a nurse who wanted to attend a meeting posed a challenge. Nonetheless, our frontline nurses sought to participate in changes occurring in the hospital. They wanted to have a voice.

In Feel the Pull: Creating a Culture of Nursing Excellence, author Gen Guanci provides a road map for organizations seeking guidance on the Magnet[R] journey and desiring cultural transformation. Bay Park nursing leaders sought to create such a culture. Feel the Pull provided a great deal of insight and information. In it, Guanci cites the work of shared-governance pioneer Tim Porter-O'Grady, who describes the value of creating an environment where shared governance thrives. Developing a strong foundation of shared governance, Guanci explains, promotes autonomy, enhances critical-thinking skills, and advances a learning environment.

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But before we could transform our culture, we had to review staff feedback regarding their difficulty finding time to attend meetings. When brainstorming ways to support increased staff participation, we hit on the idea of establishing a specific day each month to consolidate all meetings. Our solution--"Meeting Mondays"--resulted from leaders' willingness to listen to staff concerns. Our chief nursing officer gave moral and financial support to the concept. This was important, as implementing the initiative would strain the budget.

How Meeting Mondays works

All nursing meetings are held on the third Monday of each month, with one meeting held every hour starting at 9 a.m. and continuing until 4 p.m. Lunch is provided at the professional nurse council (PNC) meeting held at noon.

Each unit has a unit practice council (UPC), where staff members can take up issues for discussion and resolution. If these issues can't be resolved through discussion with the director of the acute care or the medical/surgical intensive care unit (ICU) or with the patient care supervisor, the UPC chair brings them to the PNC. A process map showing the pathway to the proper committee or council for issue resolution is available to all nursing staff.

A boost in meeting attendance

Since Meeting Mondays began, staff nurse attendance at meetings has risen significantly. Regular attendance has grown from an average of four to five staff nurses to an average of 20 to 25. All nursing units have been represented on all key committees (PNC, medication task force committee, inpatient satisfaction council, and emergency center throughput committee, to name a few).

Nurses are happy with the consistency of their meeting times. (See Rave reviews from nurses.) If a staff member is working on the day a meeting will be held, additional support is scheduled so she or he can attend that meeting. …

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