Social Entrepreneurship : One Response to the Crisis

European Social Policy, February 17, 2014 | Go to article overview

Social Entrepreneurship : One Response to the Crisis


Social entrepreneurship, which is about developing a traditional enterprise to resolve social or environmental problems, such as providing creches, housing or services for the elderly, has enjoyed a fresh burst of interest in recent years in Europe and across other continents. For good reason. Despite the crisis, these enterprises have created thousands of jobs while making a significant contribution to social inclusion and innovation.

Currently, according to the European Commission, one in four companies in the European Union falls into the social economy category. Anchored in an age-old tradition in France, where it accounts for 10% of gross domestic product (GDP) and more recently in Germany, where it represents 4.1% of GDP - the same as the automobile industry (1)- this form of company is making headway in Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy and Spain.

It has made much more modest progress elsewhere, where "there was no such thing as a social enterprise," points out Penny Newman, well known in the UK for having contributed to its development over the last twenty years.

The reason for this entrepreneurial phenomenon, so little known by the general public, is the economic crisis. This is leading to higher unemployment and a crisis in the liberal model that hands over all social responsibility to member states to deal with on their own. "The crisis has challenged the Western model, based on the free market and a welfare state," say Henri Malosse, president of the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) and three Commissioners: Antonio Tajani (industry and entrepreneurship), Michel Barnier (internal market and services) and Laszlo Andor (employment, social affairs and inclusion)

(2). For them, "new European growth" is necessary. It will need "to turn its back on the irresponsible behaviour of financial liberalism to base itself on the real economy, entrepreneurs and to enable long-term investment, be that in the development of innovating services, in the modernisation of our social and health infrastructure, in the energy transition or in the development of skills". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Social Entrepreneurship : One Response to the Crisis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.