March Is Women's History Month

Curriculum Review, February 2014 | Go to article overview

March Is Women's History Month


This Women's History Month, introduce your students to some of the lesser-known women of American history who helped shape society as we know it today.

Your class may be familiar with influential women like Susan B. Anthony, Hellen Keller, Harriet Tubman and Eleanor Roosevelt. But there are plenty more to discover!

The National Women's History Project (NWHP), sponsor of the annual Women's History Month observance in the United States, marks every year with a relevant theme as well as a new class of honorees.

Take a look at some of the iconic women chosen for 2014. How familiar are your students with each of these names? Consider creating some fresh, new lessons this Women's History Month by shining the light on some of these lesser-known women of note.

Anna Julia Cooper

1858-1964

Born a slave in North Carolina, Cooper worked throughout her life to tear down walls and create opportunities for women of color in America. She became a political activist and protester, educator and author of the iconic text, A Voice from the South. Cooper lived more than a century as an active player in the fight for the rights of women and minorities in the United States.

Frances Oldham Kelsey

1914--Present

Dr. Frances Kathleen Oldham Kelsey was a pharmacologist who worked with the United States Food and Drug Administration during the 20th century. She took bold stances against the inadequate testing of drugs, specifically thalidomide. In 1962, Kelsey was awarded the President's Award for Distinguished Federal Civilian Service by President John F. Kennedy. Kelsey's efforts throughout her career helped to shape the drug regulation policies used by today's FDA.

Roxcy O'Neal Bolton

1926-Present

Known as "Florida's Pioneer Feminist" and a leader in the establishment of Florida's Dade County chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW), Bolton became the National Vice President of NOW in 1969. A Mississippi native and pioneer's daughter, Bolton worked to help women her whole life, founding America's first Rape Treatment Center in 1974 and women's shelter in Florida 1972. …

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