MAKILINC with Michael Steger

Manila Bulletin, March 2, 2014 | Go to article overview

MAKILINC with Michael Steger


During the CUT International Performance Art Festival in Germany last year, we were so honored to be asked to perform first and to be welcomed by no less than the Open Space founder himself, Michael Steger. He was personally introduced to us during the event, held at the Berlin Walls East Side Gallery last May. As if destined, we met again after eight months during the Korean Experimental Arts Festival (KEAF). We felt like we were long lost brothers, not necessarily separated at birth. We tried to catch up and relive old memories. In doing so, we could not help but become instant yet reluctant art critics. For instance, he observed that when KEAF moved from the capital Seoul to the touristic but smaller city of Seogwipo on Jeju Island, something happened. We can never forget his answer: This changed the whole direction of this festival. In Seoul, we were quite used to the situation of performing in the Seogyo Art Center. This situation is very similar around the world. Here, you have an art space and the metropolitan audience is prepared to see art. In Seogwipo, the festival director Kim Baek-Ki, programmed our performances in the middle of a traditional market in the city center. I had a great time diving in one of the huge Korean fish tanks with a pretty big fish; so my performance, which was largely built upon humor, suited the market well, with owners getting angry if you disturbed their businesses too much. [caption id="attachment_104162" align="alignleft" width="270"] Vim Nadera (left) with gold and silversmith and Open Space founder Michael Steger at the CUT International Performance Art Festival in Berlin[/caption] This is not an easy challenge. What can you express artistically in a commercial space like a traditional market? On one hand, these markets are already in danger of dying out. On the other hand, you dont want to merely become light entertainment to cheer up the mood of the shoppers. The best experience in KEAF this year for me, however, was the day when we did peace protest performances at the pier against the American navy base, which is under construction in Jeju. In spite or because of the horrible condition of the weatheran ice storm and very coldevery performance had enormous power. It was almost like fighting for survival with performance as your weapon. Also, the geopolitical background of this protest performance made this action really important, even though the festival lost a few sponsorships due to this action. Coming from the Westdespite the huge language barrier, which is even more extreme in South Korea it is thrilling to work with Asian artists because of the cultural differences and the completely different mindset. Everything is different, the social behavior and certainly, the artistic expression. Groups like the Physical Poets from Japan, for example, find their contemporary expression in the roots of old Asian techniques like yoga, chi gong, and butoh. These influences do not really exist in our cultural roots, and it is wonderful to allow yourself to be influenced by this depth. Many of the Asian artists I met, Kim Baek-Ki, for example, see themselves as shamans in the modern world, people who want to heal the traumas of the past in their culture. This I find inspiring.We found it inspiring, too. We founded, consequently, the very first Makiling Inter-Cultural Arts Festival (MAKILINC) that ran from Feb. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

MAKILINC with Michael Steger
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.