Schools Stand as One in Fight against Bullies and Violence

Sunshine Coast Daily (Maroochydore, Australia), March 21, 2014 | Go to article overview

Schools Stand as One in Fight against Bullies and Violence


BULLYING and violence at school are not okay.

This is the message schools across the Sunshine Coast and Australia hope to strengthen and make clear, as they mark the 2014 National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence.

The National Day of Action is all about standing together to counter bullying.

In 2013, more than 1400 schools across Australia participated by running local events, inviting guest speakers and exploring bullying and the role of bystanders in classroom lessons.

For 2014, new resources and lesson plans have been produced to help organise school events, support students to take action against bullying, and promote anti-bullying within the community.

Today, through special assemblies, newsletters, quizzes, poster competitions, art galleries, music, games, video clips promoting anti-bullying and other planned events, schools will proudly promote what they are doing to create safe and supportive environments, free from bullying and violence.

At Caloundra Christian College, the anti-bullying message is being vibrantly displayed in the form of an orange banner.

Caloundra Christian College deputy principal Andrew Priaulx said the school was proud to join more than 1400 schools nationwide in spreading the Bullying - No Way! message, and strengthening the college's ongoing message that bullying and violence at school are not okay at any time.

"Our students have written messages of support for the 2014 National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence on 90m of bright orange bunting, which is being displaying around the college. We are committed to making positive change in relation to these very important social issues," Mr Priaulx said.

The National Day of Action against Bullying and Violence, now in its fourth year, is an important date.

Through the involvement of schools and students, the special day helps shape how Australia's future generations perceive bullying, and has significant potential to shape the impact of bullying throughout Australian schools, workplaces and society, for years to come.

Minister for Education, Training and Employment, John-Paul Langbroek, said, in a statement, he was proud of the number of Queensland schools that had registered to take part in the national initiative.

"It is heartening to see state, independent and catholic schools unite to send a strong message that bullying and violence is not okay.

"Last year Queensland led the nation, with around 500 schools and almost a quarter of a million school children participating in activities on the day," he said. …

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