ORTEL: Why America's Feeble Response to Putin Doctrine Threatens World Order; Obama's Dream of an Unexceptional America Dies Hard

By Ortel, Charles | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 25, 2014 | Go to article overview

ORTEL: Why America's Feeble Response to Putin Doctrine Threatens World Order; Obama's Dream of an Unexceptional America Dies Hard


Ortel, Charles, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Charles Ortel

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Before elected officials in Russia last week, President Vladimir Putin expressed a simple doctrine: once a people anywhere vote to affiliate with the Russian Federation, he will swiftly embrace the expressed will of the people.

Proclamation of the Putin Doctrine came scant months after Secretary of State John F. Kerry said "the era of the Monroe Doctrine is over," renouncing the policy under which the U.S. had long rejected meddling by foreign powers in our own hemisphere. While Russia now dares to project power abroad defiantly, America anemically retreats from many fronts.

Dangers lurk in new world of disorder

The implications of the words and actions of Mr. Putin, and those of President Obama are chilling for investors who care about the long-term.

In Central Europe, Crimea is no longer part of Ukraine and that is cold, hard fact. Forget offering Russia an "off-ramp" -- Mr. Putin speeds along in the fast lane breezily projecting newfound confidence, while almost effortlessly extending Russia's domain. He will not stop in Crimea, or even in Ukraine itself.

A close reading of Mr. Putin's remarks reveals his stalwart belief that the Western system is flawed, not so much for cherishing liberty but because we shun taking responsibility for fixing evident, mounting problems in our own economies.

Opening the World Economic Forum at Davos in January 2009, Mr. Putin correctly stated: "Excessive intervention in economic activity and blind faith in the state's omnipotence is another possible mistake."

Moments later, he added: "In the 20th century, the Soviet Union made the state's role absolute. In the long run, this made the Soviet economy totally uncompetitive. This lesson cost us dearly. I am sure nobody wants to see it repeated."

Looking at the course of events since January 2009, I am not so sure. Since then, America and its Western allies have followed a dangerous course by running excessive government deficits, by suppressing key borrowing rates, and by piling on towering debt burdens that soon must be brought under control. The chief business in America has become government -- in a form that seems beyond apparent control.

In contrast, Russia under Mr. Putin practices important economic policies that are far to the right of America's policies.

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