Must-Reads This Season of Lent

Manila Bulletin, April 6, 2014 | Go to article overview

Must-Reads This Season of Lent


This Lenten season, and especially during Holy Week, the Catholic faithful follow time-honored traditions which give them an opportunity to express externally their devotion to Christ crucified by reflecting on his passion, death and resurrection. These outward expressions of faith and devotion are made more meaningful when one plans to do great things for God and his neighbor by understanding Church teaching. And what better way to inspire such plan than with spiritual and devotional reading. So to the devout and those looking to establishing or continuing a personal relationship with God, we recommend the following books: Answers, Not Promises by Mother Angelica. Mother Angelica, the contemplative Franciscan nun who founded the worlds largest Catholic television network, dispenses gems of wisdom and gives spiritual direction on faith, love, and forgiveness. The book also talks about the rarely discussed subjects of heaven, purgatory and hell. With her trademark wit and humor, she gives fresh insights with regard to lifes dilemmas. She says, More and more people have learned often the hard way that the promises of this world are empty promises. I dont believe in the promises of this world. I believe in answersWe are called to embrace the answers that even now lie within our grasp. Literary Giants, Literary Catholics by Joseph Pearce. The author explores the depths of Catholic literature in the 20th century by looking to the lives of renowned authors and converts to the Catholic faith such as G.K. Chesterton (lay theologian, dramatist, literary critic and biographer) and J.R.R. Tolkien (author of the best-seller Lord of the Rings). This book is especially recommended to lovers of the written word and English literature. Will Many Be Saved? by Ralph Martin. Martin, professor of theology and one of the three hosts of the EWTN series The New Evangelization, tackles the teachings of Vatican II as to the question of how those who have not heard the Good News can be saved from eternal damnation (something that gives hope even to the unbelievers). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Must-Reads This Season of Lent
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.