Ensuring Sustainability Through: The Nestle Cocoa Plan

African Business, March 2014 | Go to article overview

Ensuring Sustainability Through: The Nestle Cocoa Plan


The Nestle Cocoa Plan is Nestle's approach to sustainability in cocoa supply. The Nestle Cocoa Plan is an example of Nestle's core business principle, which we call 'Creating Shared Value' - meaning that while we are creating a stronger business for the future, we also create value for the communities in which we operate.

The purpose of this initiative is to work closely with various members of the whole supply chain to improve the lives of cocoa farmers and the quality of their crops. To achieve this, we work under three main action pillars: enabling farmers to run profitable farms, improving social conditions, and sourcing good quality, sustainable cocoa. Underlying all of these efforts is collaboration with our partners and promoting transparency in our operations.

Supporting agriculture through R D Centre

Nestle launched the Nestle Cocoa Plan with a commitment to distribute 12 million high-yielding plantlet to farmers within 10 years in order to contribute towards rejuvenating their old cocoa plantations.

The Research and Development Centre that Nestle opened in Abidjan in 2009 has developed expertise in plant propagation techniques and works closely with the Ivorian national research center, CNRA.

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We propagate the best planting material received and approved by the CN RA and offer them to the cocoa farmers in Cote d'Ivoire. Our Nestle Agronomists, in collaboration with the national extension service and in concert with our suppliers, train the farmers before they receive the plants. The training concerns good agricultural and environmental practices, integrated pest and farm input management, as well as issues on workers' rights. The training sessions, organized in the farm context, are called "farmer field school" or agricultural classroom. promoting hygiene in schools and in I selected communities.

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The Nestle cocoa Plan has a focus on 1 women empowerment by supporting beneficiary mothers, providing them with funds for entrepreneurship and scholarship.

Long term collaboration

By working with farmers, farmer organizations and our suppliers, we aim to ensure long-term supply of good quality cocoa for our consumer products.

Several cooperatives in Cote d'Ivoire have benefited from the Nestle Cocoa Plan since its inception. We favour small holder farmer aggregation into democratically controlled farmer groups such as cooperatives.

Partnerships and openness underlie all that we do. We partner with our suppliers, companies, NGOs and government organizations and aim to certify or verify compliance in our supply chain. for all citizens and corporate entities. After 20 years in operation, a wide-ranging review is under way. A commission was set up to collate citizens' views and compile these views into a number of recommendations which government has responded to. It is expected that voters will have the chance to decide on the amendments of some entrenched clauses in the constitution. Currently, Ghana is governed by an elected President. The President is elected on a first-past-the-post basis, with a run-off if none of the candidates obtains more than 50% of valid votes cast.

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The President is allowed to appoint as many Ministers as he sees fit to pursue his agenda, as long as he can get the approval of parliament, first at committee level and then by plenary. However, only 19 can sit in cabinet.

Ghana's parliament is unicameral and has 275 seats. It is led by a speaker, who is elected by members either from its ranks or outside it. The house rules demand that members either sit with government or the opposition. Members are generally loyal to the strong party whips and issues which do not get broad cross-party approval can often divide the house sharply along party lines. Currently, the National Democratic Congress, which also controls the Presidency, holds 148 of the seats in parliament with the largest opposition party, the New Patriotic Party, in control of 122. …

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