Leadership Insights: Investing in Nurses' Professional Development Reaps Benefits

By Grande, Donna | American Nurse Today, March 2014 | Go to article overview

Leadership Insights: Investing in Nurses' Professional Development Reaps Benefits


Grande, Donna, American Nurse Today


THE AMERICAN NURSES ASSOCIATION (ANA) Leadership Institute is designed to enhance leadership knowledge and professional skills to prepare nurses for career advancement. At ANA, we believe enhancing leadership acumen in the nursing profession will reap benefits to society and contribute significantly to improving health outcomes for patients.

To find out how ANA's Leadership Institute is making an impact, we interviewed Michelle Dunwoody, BSN, MS, WHNP-C, chief nurse officer of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons, who oversees 1,300 nurses in more than 100 correctional facilities nationwide. Through the Institute's "Leadership Acumen" series, Dunwoody, a captain in the U.S. Public Health Service, invested in the professional development of 106 nurse managers. She shares her thoughts about leadership needs in the nursing profession.

In your opinion, are leaders born or bred?

Some leaders are born and some are bred. Born leaders exhibit leadership qualities at a very early age. However, born leaders can and should continue to learn and continually sharpen their skills, especially as the ideals and theories on leadership evolve.

Also, I believe that individuals can learn to exhibit leadership qualities. Many people consider very outgoing individuals to be leaders, and often they are. However, shy or less outgoing individuals can be great leaders as well. Often, a shy leader has learned and honed his or her leadership skills over time.

What skills are required for emerging nurse leaders to advance in their careers?

Motivation, drive, desire, resourcefulness, openness, resiliency, and a willingness to learn are some of the key skills required for emerging nurse leaders. Opportunity must also exist, but when there are no or limited opportunities, a resourceful nurse leader creates opportunities.

What unique aspects of leadership are required of nurses working in a correctional environment?

Resiliency, flexibility, and resourcefulness are paramount for nurse leaders to handle uniquely challenging situations in a correctional environment. For example, correctional nurses work within the paradigm that all staff are correctional officers first, and therefore the security of the institution and community take first priority. …

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Leadership Insights: Investing in Nurses' Professional Development Reaps Benefits
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