History of Cinco De Mayo Cinco De Mayo in Mexico Cinco De Mayo in the United States Confusion with Mexican Independence Day

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 27, 2014 | Go to article overview

History of Cinco De Mayo Cinco De Mayo in Mexico Cinco De Mayo in the United States Confusion with Mexican Independence Day


Cinco de Mayo --or the fifth of May-- commemorates the Mexican army's 1862 victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War (1861-1867). A relatively minor holiday in Mexico, in the United States Cinco de Mayo has evolved into a celebration of Mexican culture and heritage, particularly in areas with large Mexican-American populations. Cinco de Mayo traditions include parades, mariachi music performances and street festivals in cities and towns across Mexico and the United States.

In 1861 the liberal Mexican Benito Ju[sz]rez (1806-1872) became president of a country in financial ruin, and he was forced to default on his debts to European governments. In response, France, Britain and Spain sent naval forces to Veracruz to demand reimbursement. Britain and Spain negotiated with Mexico and withdrew, but France, ruled by Napoleon III (1808-1873), decided to use the opportunity to carve a dependent empire out of Mexican territory. Late in 1861, a well-armed French fleet stormed Veracruz, landing a large French force and driving President Ju[sz]rez and his government into retreat.

Certain that success would come swiftly, 6,000 French troops under General Charles Latrille de Lorencez (1814-1892) set out to attack Puebla de Los Angeles, a small town in east-central Mexico. From his new headquarters in the north, Ju[sz]rez rounded up a rag-tag force of 2,000 loyal men--many of them either indigenous Mexicans or of mixed ancestry--and sent them to Puebla. Led by Texas-born General Ignacio Zaragoza (1829-1862), the vastly outnumbered and poorly supplied Mexicans fortified the town and prepared for the French assault. On May 5, 1862, Lorencez drew his army, well provisioned and supported by heavy artillery, before the city of Puebla and led an assault from the north. The battle lasted from daybreak to early evening, and when the French finally retreated they had lost nearly 500 soldiers. Fewer than 100 Mexicans had been killed in the clash.

Although not a major strategic win in the overall war against the French, Zaragoza's success at Puebla represented a great symbolic victory for the Mexican government and bolstered the resistance movement. …

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History of Cinco De Mayo Cinco De Mayo in Mexico Cinco De Mayo in the United States Confusion with Mexican Independence Day
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