A Review by Judith Tolnick Champa

By Furman, David | Ceramics Art & Perception, December 2013 | Go to article overview

A Review by Judith Tolnick Champa


Furman, David, Ceramics Art & Perception


THE CALIFORNIA-BASED, RENOWNED CERAMIST DAVID Furman showed selections of his 2010-2012 production from 2 October -3 November, 2012 in Lincoln, Massachusetts at the Clark Gallery. It was an astonishing presentation. Work from the studio, or better, a representation distilling an artist's work in that space--the nature of that, the residue of that and its controlled disarray--such is the apparent, overt nature of Furman's ceramic art objects. But they offer much more. These objects seem everywhere to build upon the history of art in its many guises.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Furman is a master of trompe l'oeil ceramics, frequently a maker of utilitarian, 'true-to-life' scaled works in three dimensions as well as other objects, more fancifully pictorial but equally trornpe, conceived as wall reliefs. In the Lincoln exhibition, still life subject matter tended to be pencils, crayons, brushes, or the entire evocative range of tools for pondering, making and installing work in the studio. These tools convincingly occupy what appear to be actual tin cans, or wooden file drawers, or shaped toolkits. In four other instances in this exhibition, The Act of Drawing, Formal Formality, Pencil Perspective and Table Setting for Art's Sake, the simulacrum of drawing boards (literally paper taped on a plywood board) is Furman's ground that variously presents his designs with primitive perspectival patterns or, in one instance, a planar, rectilinear array of individual units suggesting the arrangement of a watercolour tray and pencils new and stubby. Another wall work, The Remains of the Day, is vertically oriented and the most tableau-like. Upon its seemingly plywood ground, paint marks, stamps and drawing elements read as a penetratingly deconstructed abstract painting by Miro, a tribute by a like-minded surrealist several generations removed.

Inevitably and fundamentally, Furman's work conjures the iconic Painted Bronze sculptures of 1960 by Jasper Johns, the neo-dada pair of oil painted Ballantine Ale cans and the Savarin Coffee tin holding paintbrushes. With Johns, however, the bronze nature of the objects is foremost, even in his titles. Also in Johns' approach a vernacular metal translated to 'high end' bronze is made to express, at a sly remove, the surrogate artist in the studio. With Furman, in contrast, "ceramic, underglaze, glaze, lustre and enamel" are his consistent media, so his trompe-ness, his fooling, is seamless and comprehensive. Furman is of the generation of cerarnists well aware of current and late trompe l'oeil practitioners Marilyn Levine, Richard Shaw and Victor Spinski, among others, but he stands distinctively apart from them, as well.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

There is abundant self-knowledge and knowledge of the history of art in this long-term teaching ceramist (now Professor Emeritus at the Claremont Colleges in California). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Review by Judith Tolnick Champa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.