Vernon Hills Man to Climb a Mountain for Charity

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 24, 2014 | Go to article overview

Vernon Hills Man to Climb a Mountain for Charity


Byline: Mick Zawislak mzawislak@dailyherald.com

In August, college student Eric Oberwise plans to cross "climb a mountain" off his bucket list in a big way.

Several months ago, the 22-year-old engineering student from Vernon Hills started "Raising Kilimanjaro", a campaign to raise $20,000 for an organization that helps improve the quality of life for the disabled.

But the effort is more than a slogan, as Oberwise and two companions -- one of them disabled -- will attempt to scale the 19,341-foot peak, the highest in Africa and among the highest in the world.

On Saturday morning, Oberwise leaves for Malawi, Africa, to begin a 10-week stint with four other students from the University of Dayton in a program designed to use their engineering skills for humanitarian practices.

"We want to create sustainable technologies -- things that are relevant to the area and are supportable by people living there," he said.

The climb for charity to follow that program is really for people "who are conquering their own mountain," said Oberwise, a University of Dayton student who has endured an ailment that changed his perspective.

It was during a drive from Dayton to Cincinnati on Sept. 11, 2012, that the "really healthy guy" began experiencing severe stomach pain. He drove to a hospital and was told it might be a stomach ulcer or terrible indigestion. Because of the severity of the pain, he said, he was given morphine. …

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