Religious Right Extremist Barton Bemoans Passage of Women's Suffrage

Church & State, June 2014 | Go to article overview

Religious Right Extremist Barton Bemoans Passage of Women's Suffrage


Discredited Religious Right activist David Barton is at it again. This time he is claiming that it is bad for America that women have the right to vote.

During a May 1 broadcast of his WallBuilders radio program, Barton pined for the supposed "glory days" that existed prior to 1920. He spoke approvingly of the fact that women used to be barred from voting because that is what the Bible recommends.

"So family government precedes civil government and you watch that as colonists came to America, they voted by families," he said. "And you have to remember back then, husband and wife, I mean the two were considered one. That is the biblical precept.... That is a family that is voting. And so the head of the family is traditionally considered to be the husband and even biblically still continues to be so."

As usual, Barton is incorrect. According to historians working at Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia, Barton's retelling is inaccurate.

"[T]ypically, white, male property owners twenty-one or older could vote," an article on the historical site's website says. This did not include any representation for women, who were not simply counted as voting when their husband did. The scholars at Williamsburg also noted that early America was far from democratic.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"In practice, moreover, relatively few of the nation's inhabitants were able to participate in elections: among the excluded were most African Americans, Native Americans, women, men who had not attained their majority, and white males who did not own land," the article goes on to say.

Nonetheless, Barton contended that since women gained the right to vote in 1920, in the United States, "we've moved into more of a family anarchy kind of thing."

"[T]he bigotry we're told they held back then, they didn't hold," he said, apparently ignoring the fact that women had few legal rights and African Americans were enslaved. "And what they did was they put the family unit higher than the government unit and they tried to work hard to keep the family together."

Barton went on to blame the supposed decline of the family for the downfall of America. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Religious Right Extremist Barton Bemoans Passage of Women's Suffrage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.