Trusteeship Council Reviews Conditions in Pacific Islands

UN Chronicle, June 1985 | Go to article overview

Trusteeship Council Reviews Conditions in Pacific Islands


Trusteeship Council reviews conditions in Pacific Islands

The Trusteeship Council on 11 July adopted its report to the Security Council on the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, in which it reiterated that "free association is an option entirely compatible with the Trusteeship Agreement, provided that the population concerned has freely accepted it". At the same time, the Council reaffirmed "the inalienable right of the people of Micronesia to self-determination, including the right to independence, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the Trusteeship Agreement".

The fifty-second session of the Council had begun on 13 May. The Council is composed of five members: the United States as an Administering Authority and China, France, the USSR and the United Kingdom, the other permanent members of the Security Council. China, however, does not participate in the Council's work.

The Trust Territory--also known as Micronesia--was the only one of the original 11 Territories under the Trusteeship System to be designated a "strategic area" under the Charter. Because of that status, the Trusteeship Council reports to the Security Council about the conditions in Micronesia, having been assigned that task by the Security Council.

The report (T/L.1245), which dealt with political, economic, social, educational, cultural and environmental issues, was adopted by a show-of-hands vote of 3 in favour (France, United Kingdom, United States), to 1 against (USSR), with no abstentions.

The Council also adopted, without objection, a resolution (T/L.1246) setting out the terms of reference for a United Nations Visiting Mission to the Trust Territory in 1985. Under the resolution, the Visiting Mission would visit the Trust Territory in July 1985, and would be composed of members of the Council wishing to participate, except for the Administering Authority, the United States, which would provide and escort officer.

Before adopting its report as a whole, the Council held a separate vote on the four sections comprising the conclusions and recommendations under the headings "Political Advancement", "Economic Advancement", "Social Advancement and Environmental Issues", and "Educational Advancement and Cultural Affairs". It also held a separate vote on a paragraph which recommended that the Council adopt the conclusions and recommendations set out in the annex and include them at the end of its report. The results of those votes were the same as that taken on the report as a whole.

The Drafting Committee for the Council's report was composed of France and the United Kingdom. The report stated that in the light of the general discussions in the Council on conditions in the Territory, the Committee had drafted a number of conclusions and recommendations which it considered as reflecting the opinions of the majority of the Council members.

Report

Concerning political advancement, the Council considered that the Compacts of Free Association, which involved a very considerable degree of autonomy, notably in the area of foreign affairs, were not incompatible with self-government. It also reiterated the view that to make it possible to bring the Compact for Palau into effect it appeared to be for the Governments of the United States and Palau to look for a solution to the problem of perceived incompatibilities between the proposed Compact and Palau's Constitution.

On international relations, the Council expressed pleasure that the international contacts by the Territorial governments continued to expand with the encouragement of the Administering Authority, and urged the Administering Authority to facilitate and encourage those governments to take up membership in organizations such as the Asian Development Bank and the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) once the Trusteeship Agreement came to an end.

With regard to economic advancement, the Council requested the Administering Authority to encourage establishment of an economic development office for the whole Territory, and expressed the hope that efforts would be made to achieve a common standard for future statistical reporting by the four entities in the Territory. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Trusteeship Council Reviews Conditions in Pacific Islands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.