Strike against Canada Bank Seen as Pivotal Labor Fight

By Lake, David | American Banker, July 15, 1985 | Go to article overview

Strike against Canada Bank Seen as Pivotal Labor Fight


Lake, David, American Banker


Strike Against Canada Bank Seen as Pivotal Labor Fight

The Canadian financial services industry is closely watching talks between the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and the Union of Bank Employees aimed at ending a strike against the bank that could have far-reaching consequences.

Since mid-June, 250 striking employees have kept closed down a key Visa card-processing center in Toronto that serves 650 Ontario branches of Canadian Imperial. If labor wins its battle over certain salary and employee security considerations, Canada's third largest bank stands to lose millions while the union will have gained an important foothold.

But if Canadian Imperial wins, an already disintegrating union movement within the 150,000 employees of Canadian banks could become practically nonexistent.

In past years, banks have fought hard to keep unions out of the industry. To date they have succeeded. Of 7,500 bank branches, only 62, with 1,542 employees, have been unionized. That figure accounts for about 1% of the work force. Canadian Imperial itself has 420 unionized workers in seven branches out of 32,000 employees and 1,560 branches.

When the Canadian Labour Relations Board decided unions could certify individual branches in 1977, union leaders had bright hopes for the future. But establishing an effective union by organizing across Canada branch by branch, with each unit separate for collective bargaining purposes, has proven a difficult task.

Besides the Union of Bank Employees, the unions that have tried include the Brewery Workers, United Food and Commercial Workers International, and the Confederation of National Trade Unions.

The Union of Bank Employees is affiliated with the two-million-member Canadian Labour Congress, which is having problems of its own. Key battles have been lost with T. Eaton Co., the department store chain, and with Michelin Tires (Canada) Ltd. In other areas, union negotiators have worked hard just to maintain the status quo.

After eight years and millions of dollars spent trying to organize the bank work force, the Labour Congress and Union of Bank Employees have reached an impasse. Dissatisfaction with bargaining results among unionized bank employees has lowered membership from a high of 93 units and 2,000 workers to present levels.

The 250-person "Visa unit' is the largest group of organized bank workers in Canada. When contemplating negotiations for this unit, the Union of Bank Employees asked the Labour Congress for an experienced collective agreement negotiator. It turned to the powerful and victorious United Auto Workers for negotiator Jim O'Neill.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Strike against Canada Bank Seen as Pivotal Labor Fight
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.