Weekend Specials at Big City Hotels

Sunset, December 1985 | Go to article overview

Weekend Specials at Big City Hotels


Once the convention is gaveled to a close and the business travelers have exited the revolving lobby doors, many big city hotels are finding a good number of rooms left vacant until the work week starts again. This dilemma has prompted a current trend in the hotel business: the weekend special.

Some cut regular rates by as much as 50 percent if you stay on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday nights (in some cases on Thursdays, too). Others throw in the use of racquet courts and fitness rooms, complimentary meals and cocktails, and show tickets. And possibly a free butler: at the Sheraton Grande Hotel in Los Angeles, he'll draw your bath, serve a nightcap, and even tuck you into bed.

Lower weekend rates exist in all the West's largest business centers from Anchorage to San Diego, Denver to Portland. But don't look for them in Reno, Las Vegas, or Honolulu, where you're more likely to find midweek promotions.

Be sure to request the weekend specials when making reservations--you may not automatically get the reduced rate. All reservations are subject to availability; if big conventions are in town over the weekend, you may be out of luck.

Listed at right are major chains with hotels in 6 or more of the West's 10 largest cities. These offer discount programs in some or all of their locations.

The special rates (given here for double occupancy) may vary with locale and amenities, and some are valid only until December 31. The toll-free 800 numbers are for central reservations nationwide.

Best Western International; (800) 528-1234. …

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