Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

General Assembly Calls on All States to Become Parties to Convention on the Law of the Sea

UN Chronicle, February 1986 | Go to article overview

General Assembly Calls on All States to Become Parties to Convention on the Law of the Sea


General Assembly calls on all States to become Parties to Conventio on the Law of the Sea

The General Assembly on 10 December 1985 called on all States that had not done so to consider ratifying or acceding to the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea at the earliest "to allow the effective entry into force of the new legal regime for the uses of the sea and its resources".

In adopting resolution 40/63 by a vote of 140 in favour to 2 against (Turkey, United States), with 5 abstentions (Federal Republic of Germany, Israel, Peru, United Kingdom, Venezuela), the Assembly asked all States to: safeguard the unified character of the Convention and related resolutions; desist from taking actions which "undermine the Convention or defeat its object and purpose"; and observer the Convention's provisions when enacting their national legislation.

An early adoption of the rules for registration of pioneer investors was urged, and note was taken of the 30 August 1985 Declaration of the Preparatory Commission for the International Sea-Bed Authority and for the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea.

The Declaration, recommended by the Group of 77 developing countries, reaffirmed that no State or person should claim, acquire or exercise rights with regard to minerals recovered from the sea-bed except in accordance with the Convention. "Deep concern" was expressed that some States had undertaken actions that "undermined" the Convention and were "contrary" to the Commission's mandate. The Commission declared that any claim or action regarding the international sea-bed area and its resources undertaken outside its purview and incompatible with the Convention would be rejected as a basis for creating legal rights and regarded as "wholly illegal". The Declaration also noted a letter from the Soviet Union regarding the "license granted by the United States of America for the exploitation of parts" of the international sea-bed area.

Report: The Secretary-General reported (A/40/923) the Law of the Sea Convention had closed for signature on 9 December 1984, having received a total of 159 signatures. The Convention was to enter into force 12 months after the date of the deposit of the sixtieth instrument of ratification or accession. As of 19 November 1985, 25 such instruments had been deposited with the Secretary-General.

Describing the influence the Convention's provisions had exerted on national policy, the report noted the enactment of legislation defining the limits of territorial seas and exclusive economic zones. It pointed also to maritime delimitation disputes that had been settled peacefully since the Convention was adopted--between Argentina and Chile, Guinea and Guinea-Bissau, and Malta and the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

The Secretary-General cited a growing tendency in the international community to promote the peaceful uses of the oceans. Attention was drawn to a 1985 study on the naval arms race (A/40/535); and adoption by the South Pacific Forum of the South Pacific Nuclear-Free Zone Treaty.

Developments in maritime law were reviewed, relating to maritime safety and navigation; rescue at sea and piracy; registration of ships; maritime labour law; and marine pollution, including the dumping of radioactive wastes at sea and into the sea-bed. Regional and international initiatives in the area of fisheries management and development were also discussed, as was the state of marine science and technology.

The work of the Preparatory Commission for the International Sea-Bed Authority and for the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea was reviewed. The Commission, established in 1982, is concerned with the elaboration of a sea-bed mining code and rules concerning the registration of pioneer investors (countries and consortia that have already begun exploration, research and development work related to the mining of polymetallic nodules); alleviating problems that sea-bed mineral production might pose for developing countries whose economies are dependent on land-based production of copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese; preparing for sea-bed mining by the Enterprise (the operational arm of the International Sea-Bed Authority); and making administrative, financial and budgetary preparations for the Authority.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

General Assembly Calls on All States to Become Parties to Convention on the Law of the Sea
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.