Acid Rain Linked to Damaged Lakes

By Peterson, Ivars | Science News, March 22, 1986 | Go to article overview

Acid Rain Linked to Damaged Lakes


Peterson, Ivars, Science News


Acid rain linked to damaged lakes

Locked in sediments beneath many freshwater lakes is a fossil record of water acidity stretching back hundreds of years. These records are among the many pieces of evidence that have now led a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel to conclude that acid rain has damaged lakes in the northeastern United States.

Although some scientists had long suspected that such a connected exists, others had proposed alternative explations for fishless acid lakes -- from natural acidification to the effects of farming and lumbering (SN: 3/17/84, p. 164). The NAS study released last week, "Acid Deposition: Long-Term Trends," suggests that in certain cases, none of the alternative explanations accounts for lake acidity as fully as the effect of sulfur dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and the resulting acid deposition.

"The connection between acid rain and environmental damage is real," says James H. Gibson of Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, who chaired the panel, "but it is more variable and complex than many people have supposed." Individual lakes vary widely in their response to acid rain, he says. Nevertheless, the report goes a long way toward linking sulfur dioxide emissions with lake acidification. According to the Academy, this report is "the most comprehensive effort to date" to document acid rain causes and effects.

One important element in the study was the analysis of sediment cores taken from lake bottoms. The number and types of fossil microorganisms called diatoms found in different layers of these sediments provide a sensitive measure of lake acidity. "Diatom analysis is the best technique that we have available for inferring past [acidity] histories of lakes," says biologist Donald F. Charles of Indiana University in Bloomington.

The researchers discovered that natural acidification normally occurs over hundreds or thousands of years.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Acid Rain Linked to Damaged Lakes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.