Guidelines on Confidence-Building Sent by Disarmament Commission to General Assembly

UN Chronicle, August 1986 | Go to article overview

Guidelines on Confidence-Building Sent by Disarmament Commission to General Assembly


Guidelines on confidence-building sent by Disarmament Commission to General Assembly

Draft guidelines for appropriate types of confidence-building measures were approved by the United Nations Disarmament Commission at its 1986 session (New York, 5-23 May). The Commission also took action relating to nuclear and conventional disarmament negotiations and reduction of military budgets, and discussed the United Nations role in the field of disarmament, the naval arms race and South Africa's nuclear capability.

The guidelines for confidence-building measures have been under consideration by the Commission since 1983. During the three-week session, the Commission's Committee of the Whole reached consensus on all but two issues, for which alternative formulations were included in the text, after it appeared, according to the Chairman, that "a further rapprochement of views could not be accomplished at this juncture'.

The draft guidelines are to be forwarded to the General Assembly in the Commission's report (A/41/42), for consideration at the 1986 session.

"The ultimate goal of confidence-building measures', according to the guidelines, "is to strengthen international peace and security and to contribute to the prevention of all wars, in particular nuclear war'. The text states that "confidence-building measures must be neither a substitute nor a pre-condition for disarmament measures, nor divert attention from them, yet their potential for creating favourable conditions for progress in this field should be fully utilized in all regions of the world, in so far as they may facilitate and do not impair in any way the adoption of disarmament measures'.

A centrally important task of confidence-building measures is to reduce the dangers of misunderstanding or miscalculation of military activities, the text indicates. "Given the enhanced awareness of the importance of compliance, confidence-building measures may serve the additional objective of facilitating verification of arms limitation and disarmament agreements.'

The draft suggests that confidence-building measures might be worked out and implemented independently of disarmament measures, to help create favourable conditions for adopting additional disarmament measures, or as collateral measures in connection with specific arms limitation and disarmament measures.

Confidence-building measures should be implemented at the global as well as regional level, the guidelines recommend, affirming that the two approaches would be "complementary and interrelated', rather than contradictory, and that progress on one level could contribute to advancement on the other.

Agreement could not be reached on draft guidelines under the heading "characteristics' of confidence-building. Alternative formulations were offered for paragraphs on the process of confidence-building and exchange of information on security and disarmament issues.

During informal consultations, the question arose whether the draft guidelines should be accompanied by a more specific illustrative catalogue of individual confidence-building measures. Several delegations had submitted proposals in that regard.

The Chairman reported, however, that it appeared from the debates that "no easy answer to the question was possible, since obviously a catalogue of special measures would somehow be in contradiction to the finding in the guidelines that confidence-building measures had to be tailored to specific circumstances, particularly in a regional differentiation'.

Nevertheless, it was felt, he said, that a structured compilation of measures suggested for inclusion in the catalogue would be useful to facilitate later consideration of the issues. An overview in that regard was submitted by the Chairman.

Arms race, nuclear disarmament: The Contact Group established by the Committee of the Whole to consider various aspects of the arms race and nuclear arms race and nuclear disarmament with an eye to elaborating a general approach to disarmament negotiations was unable to reach consensus on a complete set of recommendations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Guidelines on Confidence-Building Sent by Disarmament Commission to General Assembly
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.