Draft Principles on Remote Sensing Activities Approved by Outer Space Committee

UN Chronicle, August 1986 | Go to article overview

Draft Principles on Remote Sensing Activities Approved by Outer Space Committee


Draft principles on remote sensing activities approved by Outer Space Committee

A set of 15 draft principles relating to the remote sensing of the Earth by satellite--the product of 12 years' work--was endorsed by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space at its 1986 session (2-13 June, New York).

The draft principles, to be forwarded to the General Assembly for its approval, were approved by the Committee's Legal Sub-Committee at its session earlier this year (24 March-11 April, Geneva). They are intended to encourage the appropriate use of remote sensing and to promote the sharing, particularly with developing countries, of the possibilities offered by the technology.

The text, as set out in the Committee's report to the Assembly (A/41/20), states: "Remote-sensing activities shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic, social or scientific and technological development, and taking into particular consideration the needs of the developing countries'.

The principles call for remotesensing activities to be conducted in accordance with international law-- and not "in a manner detrimental to the legitimate rights and interests of the sensed State'. The draft also declares that remote sensing should be used to protect the Earth's natural environment and protect mankind from natural disasters.

A number of the principles relate to apects of international co-operation and assistance in remote-sensing activities. Others relate to access by the "sensed' State to primary and processed data and available analysed information concerning its territory, on a non-discriminatory basis and on reasonable cost terms. Final principles relate to international responsibilities for remote-sensing activity, and to regulation of disputes resulting from application of the principles.

The Committee's Scientific and Technical Sub-Committee, at its 1986 session (10-21 February, New York), reiterated its view that remote sensing should take into account the "fundamental urgent need to provide appropriate and non-discriminatory assistance' to developing countries, and emphasized the need to make remote sensing data available at reasonable cost. Because many countries had become dependent on data from operational meteorological satellites, it was necessary to guarantee continuation and further development of services, that Sub-Committee said (see UN Chronicle 1986, No. 3).

After the draft principles were approved by the Committee, the Soviet Union said the text should be interpreted as imposing on States an obligation to ensure that remote sensing of territories beyond their jurisdiction, whether carried out by governmental or non-governmental institutions, was done in accordance with the draft principles. States should also be held responsible internationally for damages that might result from their remote senting activities. In addition, stated the USSR, the draft principles should be viewed as merely a first step to be followed by the drafting of an appropriate international agreement on remote sensing.

The Federal Republic of Germany, United States, India, Sweden, the Netherlands and Iraq reserved their rights to make interpretative statements about the remote-sensing text at the 1986 Assembly session.

Chairman's statement: In opening the session, Committee Chairman Peter Jankowitsch (Austria) noted the accomplishments in the field of outer space over the past year, including the growth of international satellite-related programmes such as COSPAS/ SARSAT, a search and rescue operation sponsored by Canada, France, the Soviet Union and United States, and the expansion of international telephone and television services with the launching of three new satellites by INTELSAT, the international satellite communications organization.

In February 1986, he said, the Soviet Union had launched the first module for the Mir (Peace) permanent space station system, and the United States, as part of its space shuttle programme, in October 1985 had launched the largest crew ever--eight astronauts, including two from the Federal Republic of Germany and one from the Netherlands.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Draft Principles on Remote Sensing Activities Approved by Outer Space Committee
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.