NEWS ANALYSIS: Banks under New Pressure to Protect Privacy - or Else

By McCONNELL, Bill | American Banker, August 11, 1998 | Go to article overview

NEWS ANALYSIS: Banks under New Pressure to Protect Privacy - or Else


McCONNELL, Bill, American Banker


The Clinton administration and Congress in recent weeks have sent the financial industry fair warning: Get serious about protecting customer privacy or face tougher regulations.

Even Vice President Gore has weighed in, endorsing a "Privacy Bill of Rights" that would give consumers more say over how their financial and medical data are used.

"Privacy has now become a mainstream political issue on the same level as fixing Social Security and figuring out what to do with the federal budget surplus," said Martin E. Abrams, vice president of information policy and privacy for Experian in Allen, Tex.

Industry leaders are worried that poor performance by nonfinancial businesses will saddle bankers with regulation they say is unnecessary.

"For banks and financial firms, which have always considered personal information to be sacrosanct, there is real concern there could be a rush to umbrella legislation," said John J. Byrne, senior federal legislative counsel for the American Bankers Association.

But so far policymakers are pursuing narrow initiatives designed to stop specific problems. For example, legislation introduced by House Banking Committee Chairman Jim Leach would make it a federal crime to obtain customer information from financial institutions under false pretenses.

Next week banking regulators are expected to issue an "interagency alert" to warn bankers of the tricks unscrupulous information brokers use to dupe employees into giving out confidential information.

The regulators will also provide guidance on security measures and authentication measures banks should put in place.

The Senate has gone a step beyond Rep. Leach's bill, approving legislation July 30 that would make it a federal crime to steal Social Security numbers and other personal information from any source and make it illegal to use stolen information to open financial accounts or establish lines of credit under a victim's name.

As more companies offer Internet transactions, policymakers are pressuring the industry to disclose on their Web pages how information gleaned from on-line contracts and credit applications will be used. …

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NEWS ANALYSIS: Banks under New Pressure to Protect Privacy - or Else
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