Indian Art at Its Best ... in Santa Fe, August 22 and 23

Sunset, August 1987 | Go to article overview

Indian Art at Its Best ... in Santa Fe, August 22 and 23


Indian art at its best . . . in Santa Fe, August 22 and 23

It bursts upon Santa Fe with an almosthurricane gusto one weekend each August. From Hopi mesas, Rio Grande pueblos, Navajo hogans, and beyond, Indians converge on Santa Fe's Plaza for a one-of-a-kind event--Indian Market, to be held this year on August 22 and 23.

Anticipation and excitement mount asmore than a thousand of the top Indian artists and craftsmen cram into 400 canvas-shaded booths around the Plaza.

Here the newest trends are started,newest reputations made. Living legends like Cochiti's storyteller potter Helen Cordero and potters Adam and Santana Martinez of San Ildefonso join less wellknown artisans, greeting visitors and answering questions about their work.

Santa Fe's population probably triples asthe town overflows with scholars, dealers, and collectors. They're irresistibly drawn not only to the market--the world's largest exhibition of traditional and contemporary Indian arts and crafts--but also to a rich array of doings the preceding week.

Among the programs scheduled for this66th market are Indian art auctions, seminars, the nation's biggest American Indian antique art show, and many exhibits in the town's myriad galleries. Indian Market Magazine has details for all events: for a copy send $3 (including postage) to SWAIA, Box 1964, Santa Fe 87504, or call (505) 983-5220.

Whether you come to buy or just to lookand learn, having a plan will help you make the most of this event.

Choosing a strategy.

Indian Market officially begins on Saturday,August 22, but most visitors come early. Even if you've come just to look, it helps to decide in advance which booths interest you most. They're numbered consecutively around the Plaza and down Lincoln Avenue. …

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