State of Yucatan: Chichen Itza

By Rosen, Fred | The Saturday Evening Post, October 1987 | Go to article overview

State of Yucatan: Chichen Itza


Rosen, Fred, The Saturday Evening Post


State of Yucatan: Chichen Itza

A crowd of Mexicans and Anglos at the Temple of the Jaguar edged forward, waiting for the mystical appearance of the ancient Mayan serpent god, Kukulcan (Quetzalcoatl to the Aztecs). Many of these people had previously encountered the serpent god only in a 1982 film, in which Quetzalcoatl arrives in New York City to wreak havoc.

But as the sun set this past March 21, the first day of spring, Kukulcan would "appear' once again as he has for ten centuries in the ancient Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza, located in the jungles of the Yucatan Peninsula. Scientists believe the structure's alignment and dimensions are linked with the movement of the sun and the measurement of time.

More than 30,000 people had gathered in front of El Castillo (Kukulcan) pyramid. At 4:30 p.m., the Mexican dancers who had been entertaining the crowd stopped. Everyone turned toward the pyramid, where Kukulcan was materializing.

The god's appearance began with one triangle of light after another on the side of the pyramid's staircase. When they linked up, the onlookers could clearly make out his long tail, then his body, edged in brilliant, yellow sunlight, slithering down the steps of the pyramid to link up with the serpent's head the Mayans had carved centuries ago in the bottom of the balustrade.

Photographers blazed away as the setting sun made Kukulcan's shape sharper and sharper. By 5:15, the sunlight began to wane. Kukulcan disappeared from the bottom up, one triangle of light, then another and another, until finally, he was gone.

Kukulcan made his latest appearance, as he does every year, on the first day of autumn.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

State of Yucatan: Chichen Itza
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.