Using Integration Models

By Schultz, Kimberly | Techniques, November 1998 | Go to article overview
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Using Integration Models


Schultz, Kimberly, Techniques


Integration of academic and vocational education, learning styles, multiple intelligences and school-to-work initiatives plays an important role in the instruction of the business education student. Business education instructors are well-equipped with a variety of integration models to adapt learning concepts to the needs of individual students.

Business education instructors have consistently followed the Norton Grubb integration models of incorporating academic content in a vocational course. Whether it be mathematical concepts presented in an accounting lesson, English grammar rules in a keyboarding assignment or the study of an oil spill's economic repercussions, Grubb's models allow for practical applications of academic concepts.

Business education instructors also can utilize another Grubb model--collaborative efforts between academic and vocational teachers. Numerous activities designed by this pairing can promote the use of academic skills in the business arena. For example, marketing students can design promotional materials for baked goods prepared by culinary students. Computer applications students can use word processing, desktop publishing and/or presentation software skills to report research findings or produce book reports for science or English students.

In addition to Grubb's eight integration models, business education instructors can implement any of the 10 models developed by Robin Fogarty, a leading trainer and author of cognitive strategies. Fogarty's "nested model" integrates specific curricula with soft skills deemed necessary for a student's future success. Using this model, collaboration, problem solving and technological soft skills can easily be woven into the teaching of relevant business concepts. Students can work in teams to complete assignments like developing a Web page.

Business education instructors can combine Grubb's and Fogarty's models to integrate technology into business curriculum.

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