Cures for Social Phobia

By Wagner, Cynthia G. | The Futurist, December 1998 | Go to article overview

Cures for Social Phobia


Wagner, Cynthia G., The Futurist


Severe shyness in youth may become debilitating in adulthood.

Social phobia is increasingly viewed as a mental disability that is both treatable and preventable.

Social phobia goes beyond shyness: It is the extreme fear and avoidance of social situations. It is common in adults and children and is extremely debilitating, according to psychiatrists Deborah C. Beidel and Samuel M. Turner, authors of Shy Children, Phobic Adults.

Social phobia is more prevalent than once thought: Some 8% of adults and 5% of children suffer from social phobias at some time in their lives, and social phobia is the third most common mental disorder in the United States, after depression and substance abuse, according to the authors.

"Children and adults suffer significant difficulties as a result of social phobia," write Beidel and Turner. "Those with social phobia are plagued by the persistent fear that they will do something to embarrass themselves, say something stupid, or otherwise appear inept or inferior to others that will result in others developing negative impressions of them."

This extreme shyness in children can lead to developmental problems, such as not forming normal friendships and not engaging in organized group activities; as a result, they fail to develop skills essential to normal social discourse. In later life, phobic adults may avoid the experiences that cause them extreme discomfort, such as going on job interviews. If they are unable to adjust to their discomfort, their nervousness actually increases, according to Beidel and Turner.

Recent research suggests that one root of social phobia may be genetic; it is also possible that people develop social phobias by observing nervousness in others, such as a parent.

The good news is that, at least for adults, social phobia "is a highly treatable condition," and though less research has been done for treating childhood and adolescent social phobia, similar strategies may prove effective.

Treatments include both pharmacological and psychological strategies. Drugs such as antidepressants and beta-blockers have been used to treat anxiety. A relatively new class of antidepressants called SSRIs block the re-uptake of serotonin at the neural synapse. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cures for Social Phobia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.