Religious Art En Vogue

By Roemhildt, Rachel A. | Insight on the News, December 28, 1998 | Go to article overview

Religious Art En Vogue


Roemhildt, Rachel A., Insight on the News


Sales figures are up fop aPtwoPk depicting religious themes and comforting scenes of nature and family -- a trend that mirrors the popularity of heavenly minded movies such as What Dreams May Come and City of Angels.

Americans seeking hope in a troubled world are turning to soothing artwork as a balm for their jangled nerves. Frayed and weary connoisseurs are snapping up paintings such as Journey by Mary Crittenden of Yreka, Calif., which depicts two children emerging from a dark forest onto a lighted path, and Temple Gateway by William Doran of Seattle, where two moons in a starry sky illuminate a temple's columns.

"Overwhelmed by job stress, economic and social pressures, the invasive beat of the media and the pervasive presence of technology, many people are looking for something simple, quiet and comforting to hold on to," says Gerald Celente, director of the Trends Research Institute in Rhinebeck, N.Y.

"Inspirational art," a melange of feel-good illustrations loaded with New Age or traditional religious themes, is hot. The genre falls into two categories, explains Celente: that which celebrates God or that which helps viewers "search for the God within themselves."

The second category applies to Doran's work, which explores spiritual energy. A Gathering of Masters, for example, shows spirit guides helping individuals through the "crystal stair of our life experience." Says Doran, "Masters gives us the image that we are linked to another dimension of beings who help guide our way." His paintings, showcased in a virtual gallery on the Internet, appeals to members of generation X, who tend to search for truth in unusual places. "Gen Xers are not looking to organized religion," he says, "but to a new wave of consciousness of the spirituality in their lives."

Merchants in the religious-retail business are reporting the same phenomenon. For the first time in its history, the annual Christian Booksellers Association trade fair devoted a separate section to bric-a-brac, art and clothing imprinted with spiritual mottoes. "Our home decor sales are up 45 percent from last year because inspirational art is selling rapidly," says Michael Hupp, senior gift buyer for Family Christian Store, a retail chain based in Grand Rapids, Mich.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Religious Art En Vogue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.