Wool Painting Folk Art Style

By Schroeder, Liesa | School Arts, January 1999 | Go to article overview

Wool Painting Folk Art Style


Schroeder, Liesa, School Arts


When students were invited to participate in a local folk art festival, everyone began to get a little nervous--"What is folk art?" and "How can we as elementary students contribute a suitable piece of art to this community sponsored festival?" With some research about various cultures and folk art styles, students decided to embark on an adventure into the art of yarn painting, a decorative and colorful folk art, native to South America.

Students learned through their research that this ancient tradition of spreading beeswax on a wooden board and pressing yarn into the soft wax can produce brightly colored artworks that also have the appeal of texture. To begin, each student submitted designs, based on their research of South American art forms.

Traditional Designs

We selected designs on the basis of their simplicity and authentic subject matter. The influence of Oaxacan (pronounced wah hocken) folk art and mola designs from the Cuna Indian women of the San Blas Islands, appears in the selected abstract animal forms.

Pieces of heavy cardboard were used for the base of the designs instead of the traditional wooden boards. We enlarged the selected drawings to approximately 36" (91 cm) and transferred them to the cardboard surface with pencils. The children then carefully cut out the large abstract shapes from the cardboard. Then they began the process of selecting and planning the colors from bright woolen yarns that best suited their subject matter and the nature of the art itself.

Drawing with Glue

Rather than using the traditional method of melting beeswax and pressing the yarn into the wax, white glue was used to secure the yarn to the cardboard surface. The designs were first outlined with black yarn to better delineate the the shapes within the drawing. Small mirrors were glued to the cardboard surface in strategic places such as the eyes to add a reflective accent to each piece.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wool Painting Folk Art Style
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.