Million Youth Movement Marchers Gather on the East Coast and in the South

By Miller, Robert G. | Diversity Employers, October 1998 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Million Youth Movement Marchers Gather on the East Coast and in the South


Miller, Robert G., Diversity Employers


The nation was treated this past Labor Day weekend to not one but two Million Youth Movement events in New York City and Atlanta on September 5 and 7 respectively.

The New York City march in Harlem, promised earlier as a follow-up to the Million Man March in Washington in 1995 and the Million Woman March in Philadelphia last year, drew thousands of people. It was primarily organized by Khallid Abdul Muhammad, a former aide to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. Endorsements for the event came from a cross section of entertainers, athletes and civil rights activists including Rev. Al Sharpton of New York.

The theme for the rally was "Black Power into the Year 2000, Keeping it Real, Saving Our Youth, Securing Our Future." Among the things marchers called for were ending gang conflict, creating youth community security groups, and dedicating themselves to nation building. The march and rally staged over the objections of New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani was marked by a heavy show of police force resulting in officers storming the stage at the end of the court-ordered parade permit. The mayor labeled the event "a march of hate" while Rev. Sharpton criticized the mayor for not allowing a "grace period" of several minutes before shutting down the rally.

Meanwhile, their numbers only reached nearly 400 at a closing event in Atlanta on Labor Day, but as one organizer described it, this event was "very peaceful, dignified, and proud." The marchers, mostly young African Americans, marched Million through the historic neighborhood where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was born and rallied across the street from Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Dr. King once preached. There were several weekend events in Atlanta involving thousands of people from throughout the nation which culminated in the Labor Day march and rally.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Million Youth Movement Marchers Gather on the East Coast and in the South
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?