Feedback


On Sucking

Concerning the comments from Eric LaHaie of Tucson, Arizona [Feedback, Feb. '99]: Mr. LaHaie has no idea of what he is discussing. The Brian Setzer article is, in my opinion, one of the best GP has ever written. Kudos to Andy Ellis. My wife and I had the pleasure of seeing Mr. Setzer and his Big Band at the Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater in Medford, Oregon, and the band put on one of the best shows I've witnessed in the last 30 years.

Who cares, Mr. LaHaie? I care. My wife cares. My friends--who are also musicians--care. And we don't "love to see women in leopard-skin bikinis." I also find high-end product reviews interesting. Someday, I might purchase something GP reviews--most likely when it is a little older and can be bought used. And more blues, more blues, more blues!

Jim Lefeber
Grants Pass, OR

Sounds like little Eric LaHaie needs to find another guitar magazine. Brian Setzer is finally getting the coverage he deserves. If Eric thinks Guitar Player is "killing rock and roll in every issue," and then complains about blues issues, maybe it's time he realizes where rock and roll comes from--the blues! As far as his comment that "we are all burnt out on blues issues," who gave him permission to decide what I don't want to read? And, as for the complaint about product reviews on expensive guitars--Eric, there are some of us who can afford them. (I'll bet Guitar Player's advertisers are glad to hear that.) Grow up, Eric, or start your own magazine. Guitar Player is the best use of paper and ink in the music industry.

Jim Swanson
Los Angeles, CA

I received a subscription to your magazine as a gift, and while I don't want to sound too much like the letter you received from Eric LaHaie, I was extremely disappointed. All that I saw in your magazine was blues and jazz. I was expecting more rock and roll, and interviews with newer, more popular bands such as Metallica, Korn, and Limp Bizkit. I bet if people saw these bands featured in GP, they would probably subscribe to your magazine.

Tony LaFleur
Belchertown, MA

Bloomfield's "Lost" Album

This is one more vote among what must be millions clamoring for the re-release of If You Love These Blues, Play 'em as You Please. [Feedback, Jan. '99]. However, my plea on bent knee is that someone transcribe it to tab as well. After almost four years of searching for Michael Bloomfield transcriptions, all I've found is "Blues With a Feeling" and "Killing Floor." If you know of more, please tell. If you don't, we need more than just two songs! The album that Michael Bloomfield made for Guitar Player Records has enjoyed legendary critical status for more than 20 years--while being unavailable for just as long. A re-release would help fill a hole for those who revere Bloomfield as the original guitar hero.

Weldon Diers
Redding, CA

Transcriptions

I'm not so sure that featuring full-song transcriptions in the mag is such a good idea. For one thing, all the other guitar mags are doing it. For another, you've printed well-known songs for which many of us already have transcriptions laying around.

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