Collection Development in School Libraries

By Barth, Jennifer | Teacher Librarian, November 1998 | Go to article overview

Collection Development in School Libraries


Barth, Jennifer, Teacher Librarian


Collection development in school libraries

Documents

While the general principles and techniques of collection development can be applied to most libraries, the unique characteristics of each media program produce new and changing demands requiring flexibility and creativity. The collection program in schools: Concepts, practices, and information sources. Second Edition. Library science text series (ED380118), by Phyllis J. Van-Orden, brings together concepts from curriculum theory, children's and adolescent literature, educational technology and library science, reflecting the idea that collection program activities interact in a cyclical pattern. It is proposed that the principles of collection development, selection, resource sharing and acquisition be addressed as parts of a whole in a school's policy. Part 1 examines the media collection in relation to its educational setting; discusses general principles, policies and procedures of collection development; and covers issues that affect all collections and the responsibility of resolving these issues according to the goals and needs of a particular collection. Part 2 focuses on the practical considerations of materials selection including procedures; selection criteria; and meeting curricular and instructional, subject and program, and individual needs. Part 3 describes the operations involved in developing and managing a collection, and discusses the administrative concerns of acquiring materials; accessing information; maintaining the collection; evaluating the collection; and creating, shifting and closing collections. Appendix A identifies agencies and associations of use to media specialists. Appendix B is a list of bibliographic and selection sources, and Appendix C includes three statements on intellectual freedom. Information is presented in 34 figures and tables. (Contains 162 references.) This 376-page book is not available from EDRS; it is available from Libraries Unlimited, Inc., P.O. Box 6633, Englewood, CO 80155-6633 (paperback: 1-56308-334-5, $32.50; hardbound; 1-56308-120-2, $42.50).

Culturally diverse library collections for youth (ED396748), by Herman L. Totten and others, is an annotated bibliography of multicultural literature for secondary students designed to help librarians broaden and diversify their print and video collections with materials written both for and about African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans. The materials included are intended for middle, junior high and senior high school libraries as well as young adult collections in public libraries. The book is divided into five sections, four sections representing specific ethnic groups and one identifying multiethnic materials. Each of the sections lists recommended books followed by recommended videos. Entries within each section are arranged alphabetically by title. Recent but unreviewed video titles are separated from recommended and reviewed videos and are labeled as such. The Multiethnic Materials category lists works covering two or more ethnic groups. Books within each ethnic category are further subdivided by genre: biographies, folklore, literature and poetry; young adult fiction; reference and scholarly works; and nonfiction. Because of the diversity of groups covered in the Asian American section, titles are broken into sections covering Cambodian Americans, Chinese Americans, Japanese Americans, Korean Americans, Pacific Islanders and Vietnamese Americans. Titles covering more than one Asian American group are listed in a final category labeled Asian Americans-Multiethnic. Author, title and subject indexes to all titles appear at the end of the volume. This 220-page book is not available from EDRS; it is available from Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., 100 Varick St., New York, NY 10013 ($35; 1-55570-141-8).

Electronic resources: Implications for collection management (ED409017) helps librarians incorporate electronic resources into their collections.

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