Extinct Species

National Wildlife, April-May 1999 | Go to article overview

Extinct Species


I never really thought about extinct species until I read your article "Saying Goodbye" [December/January 1999]. I guess like many people I didn't relate losing species to anything in my own life. It all seems so distant to a city dweller like myself. But the author, Mark Jerome Walters, changed my perspective. His essay was not only moving, it also made me realize that we should care about all species, even when they don't live in our immediate backyard. Opponents of endangered-species protection programs might say that it's a bunch of corny rhetoric, but I think we should all understand that every species is interconnected and that to lose one threatens the survival of others--including human beings.

Daphne Emory Cleveland, Ohio

Lost Opportunity

As I read the article about extinct species in the December/January issue, tears were running down my face and my throat had a lump. I have had the privilege of seeing the Key deer in their refuge, and I can think of nothing that would distress me more than to hear that they no longer roamed the little island they call home.

My tears were for the dusky seaside sparrow, the Xerces blue butterfly, the ivory-billed woodpecker and many other extinct species. They were also for myself, for never having the opportunity to see many of these wonderful species, and for my children, who will only ever see them in books.

Melanie Fernandes Warwick, Rhode Island

Unnecessary Indulgence

"Do commercial butterfly releases pose a threat to wild populations?" That was the question you asked in a short article in your latest issue ["Natural Debate," December/January 1999]. I would pose a different question: No matter whether or not such releases pose a threat to wild butterflies, why would anyone want to release the insects as a bride and groom leave a wedding chapel? To me, it seems like the ultimate, unnecessary human indulgence.

Susan Carpenter San Diego, California

Shocking Photo

I was very shocked by the photo of the elephant seal bull and pup in your issue ["Photo Contest 1998," December/January 1999]. I understand that the photographer was unavailable for further comment, but I am confused. I hope that you will be able to contact him later and explain the photo in an upcoming issue. It was a worthy winner of the contest, but I hope the pup wasn't hurt.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Extinct Species
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.