Molly Stone, Michael Coh

The World and I, April 1999 | Go to article overview

Molly Stone, Michael Coh


The Beauty of Opposites

The enormous strides glass artists Michael Cohn and Molly Stone have made in their field flow out of the love they share for their craft. "When we bring our individual passions and talents together, the art is bigger than either of us and the dynamic greater than the parts," says Stone, who with her partner has operated the internationally known Cohn-Stone Studios in Emeryville, California, since 1980.

"Glass is technically very difficult, and our artwork can be both satisfying and challenging at the same time," she explains. "We are both committed to the integrity of good design and the highest-quality work we can obtain." Their flourishing studio has achieved a reputation for its highly innovative artistic sculpture, decorative art pieces, designer vessels, eclectic vases, bowls, and fanciful artifacts.

Both Stone's and Cohn's passion for glasswork was forged when they were young artists at Berkeley during the turbulent seventies. Although they were both driven to define themselves through their art, their styles have developed along distinctly opposite lines. Stone sought simplicity and purity of style through integrating classical forms with more complex hot and cold glassworking techniques, textures, colors, and uses of light. Her work is described as "telling her story journeying through dark external chaos to reach radiant internal serenity."

Successfully overcoming the contradictions of being big but delicate, functional yet elegant, Stone's works have opaque exteriors that positively radiate when contrasted with the glowing transparent interiors. …

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