The Scientific Revolution Reshapes the World: Galileo Galilei

By Olso, Richard G. | The World and I, April 1999 | Go to article overview

The Scientific Revolution Reshapes the World: Galileo Galilei


Olso, Richard G., The World and I


Galileo was the first of seven children of the musician Vincenzo Galilei and his noble-born wife, Julia. Born February 15, 1564, Galileo attended a monastic school at Vallombrosa before entering the University at Pisa in 1581, intending to study medicine. His interests, however, shifted toward mathematics and natural philosophy. After a brief period as a private tutor of mathematics, he accepted the chair of mathematics at Pisa in 1589, but two years later, he moved to the University of Padua. A highly gifted and charismatic teacher, Galileo was also arrogant, sarcastic, and argumentative. He gathered a large following of students, but among academic colleagues, he developed a reputation as a troublemaker.

In 1604, Galileo turned to astronomy and provided a mathematical demonstration that a newly visible bright star (probably a supernova) lay outside the system of planets. This finding implied that, contrary to Aristotelian ideas, changes did occur in the heavens. In 1609, after building a telescope similar to those being produced in the Netherlands, he began a period of spectacular astronomical observations. He discovered four moons circling Jupiter, mountains on the surface of our Moon, and the phases of Venus.

Galileo's discoveries netted him the patronage of the Medici family, as well as membership in the Accademia dei Lincei, a scientific academy sponsored by the Roman aristocrat Federico Cesi. He also received support from the major Jesuit astronomers and mathematicians at Rome and the friendship of Cardinal Maffeo Barberini, who would become Pope Urban VIII in 1624. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Scientific Revolution Reshapes the World: Galileo Galilei
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.