Face the Music and Dance

By Chambers, Veronica; Gordon, Devin | Newsweek, June 14, 1999 | Go to article overview

Face the Music and Dance


Chambers, Veronica, Gordon, Devin, Newsweek


Growing up on the small island of Nanaimo, British Columbia, Diana Krall dreamed of becoming an astronaut. "I wanted adventure," says Krall. "I wanted to explore. I built rockets in my backyard." She didn't make it to the space program, but her friend Bob Thirsk did. He even took her CD with him on the space shuttle.

This week Krall releases her fifth CD, the heavenly "When I Look in Your Eyes" (Verve). In addition to her usual trio, Krall is now backed by a lush string section. The result is a richer, more textured sound; yet the orchestra never overpowers the intimacy of her voice. For her new sound, Krall went old school, collaborating with legendary bandleader Johnny Mandel, famous for his work with Frank Sinatra and Barbra Streisand. "He called me up and said, 'Well, Diana, I just think you're the sweet spot on the baseball bat'," Krall says, laughing.

At 34, Krall has carved a unique place for herself in the jazz world. Her arranging skills are sharp and witty; additions, such as the new intro that she and bassist John Clayton worked up for "Pick Yourself Up," show an increased musical confidence. Her two previous CDs, "All for You: A Tribute to the Nat King Cole Trio" and "Love Scenes," each spent more than a year at the top of the Billboard charts and each earned Krall a Grammy nomination. "Why Should I Care?" a tune she recorded for the soundtrack to Clint Eastwood's "True Crime," is an adult-contemporary radio hit. Says Jessica Sendra, jazz buyer for Borders, "She even sells better than Wynton Marsalis."

Over lunch at New York's Union Square Cafe, Krall is dressed in a simple black shirt, pants and dark glasses. On a jazz musician's clock, the raw oysters she slurps down at 12:30 are actually breakfast. She is as pretty as her early detractors accused her of being, not seeing past her blond hair to the intelligence of her music. Waiting for her entree, she playfully quotes a Fats Waller lyric, "My very good friend, the milkman, says/It would make his burden less/If we both had the same address/So I suggest that you should marry me." Krall's sense of humor comes across most clearly in her affection for novelty songs. (Each album includes at least one.) On "Love Scenes," it was the Blossom Dearie hit "Peel Me a Grape." On this CD, it's the sweetly seductive "Popsicle Toes."

Krall grew up listening to Waller and other classic tunes. Her dad played piano; her grandmother was a singer.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Face the Music and Dance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.