Victory for Cities and Their Airports: House Votes Aviation Fund `off Budget'

By Whitman, Cameron | Nation's Cities Weekly, June 21, 1999 | Go to article overview

Victory for Cities and Their Airports: House Votes Aviation Fund `off Budget'


Whitman, Cameron, Nation's Cities Weekly


Local and state airport authorities won a major victory last week in the House with passage of the Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (Air-21). Key among provisions is a measure which assures that the Airway Trust Fund will be moved "off budget" and used only to fund aviation projects.

This bill's passage moves the issue of federal under-funding of airports and aviation system one step closer to resolution. Air-21 is the House version of five-year reauthorization of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The Senate reauthorization bill, S. 82, is expected to go to the Senate floor after the July recess, and, the conference should convene by late July, so a final bill can be signed by the President before the current FAA authorization expires, August 6, 1999.

The two provisions in Air-21 most important to cities and their airport authorities passed with strong bipartisan support. The House agreed that the Airport and Airway Trust Fund would be removed from the general budget, essentially guaranteeing that airport user fees (Passenger Facility Charges [PFC]), collected from enplaning passengers, would be spent solely on aviation projects. Currently, about half the total PFCs collected are spent on aviation projects and the remainder are spent on other federal programs.

The second important provision was agreement to permit local and state airport authorities to increase PFCs from $3.00 per passenger, to as much as $6.00. This would be allowed when federal funding is inadequate to fund needed projects approved by the Federal Aviation Administration.

"This bill begins to address the growing needs in our aviation system," Representative Bud Shuster (R-Pa.), sponsor of Air-21 said. "This bill will help modernize our air traffic control systems, reduce delays, and spur competition. What that means for flyers is safer skies and better service."

During the debate on the House floor, there was strong opposition to taking the Airport and Airway Trust Fund off budget.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Victory for Cities and Their Airports: House Votes Aviation Fund `off Budget'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.