To FOI Advocates, the Georgia Governor Is a Real Peach

By Fitzgerald, Mark | Editor & Publisher, June 5, 1999 | Go to article overview

To FOI Advocates, the Georgia Governor Is a Real Peach


Fitzgerald, Mark, Editor & Publisher


To take maximum advantage of a political honeymoon, newly elected governors typically send the state legislature a laundry list of pet projects and, perhaps, a distasteful task or two, like a tax increase.

When Democrat Roy Barnes was inaugurated as Georgia's 80th governor last January, he sent just one measure to the General Assembly: a package of proposals to strengthen the state's "Sunshine Law."

"Listen, I've been down at the legislature for 24 years, and I know how it works. They swap votes all the time," says the 51-year-old Barnes. "They'll say, 'Well, you give Roy what he wants on the highway, which you gotta support anyway, and he can't be so mad at you if you don't go along on this thing.' So we just wouldn't introduce anything else except this so they could not swap votes."

When the debates ended and the votes were counted, Georgia had considerably tougher Open Meetings and Open Records Acts and Georgia advocates of open government were ecstatic.

"Roy Barnes did more in the past legislative session to strengthen the Open Records/Open Meetings legislation than anyone had done in a decade, in fact, since Roy Barnes was in the legislature writing the bills," says Hyde Post, assistant managing editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and president of the Georgia First Amendment Foundation.

Barnes is not the only top Georgia official enthusiastic about FOI issues. State attorney general Thurbert E. Baker and his deputy, Dennis Dunn, are frequently praised by journalists for their speed in deciding open-records disputes.

When the National FOI Coalition met in Atlanta in late May, Baker made a point of attending its opening reception and introducing himself to Journal-Constitution editor Ron Martin. "We depend on you to tell us about the glitches," he told Martin. "We have people who are really interested in openness."

When the new Open Records Act takes effect July 1, it will tighten time limits, requiring public bodies to produce a requested document within three days. More than a decade ago, Barnes wrote the original language requiring a "response" within three days and says he watched in frustration as officials interpreted that to mean they could just acknowledge they received the request and continue to sit on the document. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

To FOI Advocates, the Georgia Governor Is a Real Peach
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.