`Recovered-Memory' Suit Yields Large Jury Award

By Wetzstein, Cheryl | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 4, 1999 | Go to article overview

`Recovered-Memory' Suit Yields Large Jury Award


Wetzstein, Cheryl, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


A Wisconsin woman who accused her psychiatrist of making her think she had dozens of multiple personalities and had been sexually abused by her father was awarded more than $860,000 by a jury this week.

The medical malpractice case was hailed as a victory for those who believe that "recovered-memory" therapy is false and destructive.

"This is a vindication (that) this craziness was not her fault," said William Smoler, the attorney who represented Joan Hess, 47, of Wausau, Wis., in the 15-week trial before the Marathon County jury.

Mr. Smoler said yesterday that the Hess family has reconciled and Mrs. Hess is now especially attentive to her father, who is dying of cancer.

Mrs. Hess testified that her psychiatrist, Juan Fernandez III, implanted memories during hypnosis that led her to believe she was raped, had more than 75 personalities and, with her parents, neighbors and friends, was part of a "satanic ritual cult" that engaged in bestiality and human sacrifice.

Mrs. Hess said that none of these events occurred, and that she was permanently harmed by the ordeal.

The trial drew testimony from top mental health professionals who either supported or discounted the validity of repressed-memory therapy, hypnosis, and multiple personality disorder.

Dr. Fernandez's attorneys argued that he had done "what good psychiatrists do."

"He followed his training and he followed the textbook," said defense attorney Paul Grimstad, adding that Dr. Fernandez never suggested any of the memories that Mrs. Hess reported.

Even before Mrs. Hess was hypnotized, Mr. Grimstad said, "she had a feeling there was something bad in her background, something bad in the past . . . [she] was desperate to get to the bottom of her memories, to the bottom of her childhood."

However, after 25 hours of deliberation, the jury ruled that Dr. Fernandez was negligent in his diagnosis and treatment of Mrs.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

`Recovered-Memory' Suit Yields Large Jury Award
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.