Too Much Time on Their Hands

By Paige, Sean | Insight on the News, November 16, 1998 | Go to article overview

Too Much Time on Their Hands


Paige, Sean, Insight on the News


Have you ever wondered why tortilla chips don't stay crisp longer or imagined yourself inventing a magnificent new mulch or genetically engineering the perfect blackberry? Do you lay awake at night wondering whether a wall of sunflowers also can serve as a snow fence, worrying about the water-spinach invasion of the Florida Everglades or wanting to unlock the secret of brewing a better-than-Bavarian beer?

If so, a career with the U.S. Agricultural Research Service, or ARS, is for you! As an ARS researcher, you'll not only be discovering new and ingenious ways to protect American farmers from plagues of Rhizoctonia root rot, Mediterranean fruit flies and Aspergillus flavus fungi, you'll also be pushing back the frontiers of frivolous science, pursuing whatever wacky science-fair projects pop into your hyperactive cerebellum. And when you have made that once-in-a-lifetime breakthrough, at long last breeding the world's most succulent cranberry, ARS will sign over the licensing rights to Ocean Spray or some other commercial interest for a song, allowing them to cash in -- all for the greater good of the nation!

Always a hoot and holler to read, the latest of ARS' Quarterly Reports includes the following scientific breakthroughs bankrolled by taxpayers:

* The folks at ARS' Beltsville, Md., fruit lab are bursting with pride about their new "triple-crown" blackberry breed, which yields an impressive 30 pounds of "large, sweet, aromatic" berries per plant -- keeping the United States on the cutting edge, blackberry-wise.

* After more than a decade of tests, scientists from Oregon's Horticultural Crops Research Lab are preparing to add two new breeds of strawberry to the U.S. agricultural arsenal. "Firecracker" will be medium-sized berries "best eaten fresh," according to ARS scientists, while the other new strawberry, "Independence," stands up well in field tests against insects and weather. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Too Much Time on Their Hands
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.