Courts Overspent Budget in Violation of Federal Law

By Keary, Jim | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 17, 1999 | Go to article overview

Courts Overspent Budget in Violation of Federal Law


Keary, Jim, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


D.C. Superior Court and Court of Appeals officials overspent $4.6 million in 1998 because they mismanaged its budget thereby violating the federal Anti-Deficiency Act, a General Accounting Office report shows.

The report released yesterday says that the courts were aware in the early months of the year that they would run out of money but did little to make adjustments.

"Throughout fiscal year 1998, it was clear that unless D.C. Courts modified its spending or received additional funds, it was facing a shortfall," the report says.

The GAO said that the Office of Management and Budget had warned the courts in April 1998 that it was exceeding its budget, but instead of cutting back it asked for money.

"Letters between D.C. Courts and OMB during fiscal year 1998 reflect D.C. Courts' officials expectations of receiving additional funds, and OMB's concerns that if D.C. Courts did not lower its rate of spending its obligations would exceed funding," the audit says.

The courts overspent their budget and, as a result, violated the Anti-Deficiency Act, which forbids spending unappropriated money.

The GAO has recommended that the court look into its overspending.

"The GAO has provided many constructive suggestions during this review process which the courts will use to improve operations," said Ulysses B. Hammond, the court's executive officers.

Superior Court Chief Judge Eugene H. Hamilton said through his secretary he has not received a copy of the report and would not comment. Court of Appeals Chief Judge Annice M. Wagner did not return telephone calls to her office and could not be reached for comment.

In a response to the GAO, Judge Wagner said that the courts were under funded and did not violate the Anti-Deficiency Act.

"It is likewise incorrect, as we have demonstrated, to conclude that the courts even `potentially' violated the Anti-Deficiency Act. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Courts Overspent Budget in Violation of Federal Law
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.