Kingdom Nurtures Conservation Alongside Development

By Shehadeh, Hussein | The Middle East, September 1999 | Go to article overview

Kingdom Nurtures Conservation Alongside Development


Shehadeh, Hussein, The Middle East


Determined that continued economic and social development must not be achieved at the expense of the environment, Saudi Arabia has demonstrated a firm commitment to the preservation of its unique and varied ecosystems

"Saudi Arabia operates a system of wildlife reserves, invests extensively in the preservation of endangered species, manages a sophisticated programme for captive breeding and the reintroduction of rare species and is conducting pioneering research. The ultimate objective is to ensure the compatibility of development with a healthy and thriving natural environment," says Profressor Abdulaziz H. AbuZinada, general secretary of the National Commission for Wildlife Conservation and Development (NCWCD).

To get the most out of its environmental programmes, Saudi Arabia set up the NCWCD in 1986, co-ordinating the efforts of various government agencies under the umbrella of a single national entity capable of devising and pursuing long-term conservation programmes. Chaired by Second Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defence and Aviation Prince Sultan bin Abdul-Aziz, the NCWCD has been mandated with the protection of the nation's natural heritage. It will do so through four principal means - habitat and species protection, captive breeding of endangered species and their reintroduction into the wild, legislative measures to protect the environment and public education on the subject.

"The first task to face the Commission was to conduct extensive field work to determine the country's wildlife populations, the status of different ecosystems and the steps necessary to protect them," says Abu-Zinada. By 1991 these efforts had resulted in the establishment of 10 reserves with more planned. After millions of barrels of oil were dumped into the Arabian Gulf and massive fires were started by retreating Iraqi troops, the expedition of the plans was vital. Faced with extensive damage caused to marine and terrestrial ecosystems, the NCWCD put together a plan prepared with the assistance of the World Conservation Union.

Now well under way, the plan will provide 56 terrestrial reserves, 33 marine reserves in the Red Sea and 14 marines reserves on the Gulf within the next couple of years.

"While taking steps to preserve the ecology and protect indigenous animal and plant species, the Commission has also endeavoured to build up the flora and fauna of areas that have been affected by the pressures of development and human habitation," emphasises Professor Abu-Zinada. This is being achieved through the captive breeding of species whose populations in the wild have decreased or disappeared in areas where they once thrived.

Three centres have already been established at Taif, Thumamah and Qassim to breed endangered species in captivity for eventual reintroduction to the wild.

The Taif Research Centre can be credited with the successful breeding of the houbara bustard, numbers of which declined precipitously during the past few decades. The initial stock was raised from eggs collected in the wild and successfully inseminated artificially in 1989. There are now 300 of the birds at the centre. A small flock has already been released into the wild and its progress is being monitored before more birds are released.

The King Khalid Wildlife Research Centre at Thumamah specialises in breeding three species of native gazelle, rheem, idmi and dorcas. Starting with a small herd of animals captured in the wild, the centre has managed to build up a flock of over 1,000 gazelles. Four years after the breeding programme began, animals were released into the Hawtat Bani Tamira Reserve in 1991. The centre has also successfully bred ostriches, coursers, Arabian partridge and guinea fowl. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kingdom Nurtures Conservation Alongside Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.