It's No Party Living near a College Campus: Students' Trash, Parties Trigger Neighbors' Ire

By Redmon, Jeremy | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 6, 1999 | Go to article overview

It's No Party Living near a College Campus: Students' Trash, Parties Trigger Neighbors' Ire


Redmon, Jeremy, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Sleepless area residents who live near college campuses have come to expect rowdy students partying on weekends.

But the neighbors say the "partying" has gone too far: Drunken students are parading half-naked through neighborhoods, stealing lawn furniture, breaking windows and vandalizing cemeteries.

"They are out in the streets yelling and urinating and drunk," said Burleith resident Diane DeLand, a stock trader, who is considering moving because of the problems. "I have had garbage thrown in my yard."

Fed up with the nuisance, residents living near Catholic University and Georgetown University have joined forces and will confront school officials, city police and D.C. Council members in a meeting in Northeast tonight.

The homeowners want CU to discipline students who host noisy late-night parties, clean up trash students leave on 12th Street, and help police keep tabs on students who rent property off-campus.

News of the meeting comes after The Washington Times reported on Sept. 27 that CU students were holding raging parties, fighting and parading in underclothes around the Brookland neighborhood several nights a week.

Brookland resident Darcy Flynn, 40, a federal government lawyer, said the CU student who moved into a house nearby represents "a step up" from the drug dealers who previously called it their home.

"But those drug dealers were not keeping me up at night," said Mr. Flynn, who has endured many sleepless nights because of students brawling and partying in his neighborhood.

Burleith resident Irene K. Schaffner wants Mr. Flynn to know he is not alone.

She said that Georgetown students urinate in her yard and have stolen her lawn furniture, and that one student threw a jug of cider through one of her first-floor windows early one morning.

"We've had enough of this `Boys will be boys,' " said Mrs. Schaffner, a painter. The students' "parents are in paradise because the kids are not living in their houses."

Georgetown students throw loose trash, beer cans and pizza boxes in the alleyways behind their houses, and the mess is attracting rats. Burleith residents are concerned their property values are plummeting because the students' homes are allowed to deteriorate.

Bonnie Hardy, 54, another Burleith resident, gave up inviting her friends to sit on her back porch at night because students living nearby hosted loud keg parties.

"You can pretty much tell where the parties are because you can follow the path of empty [beer] cups," said the homemaker.

Burleith residents said it is not uncommon for as many as 60 people to cram into a house for a party on weekends. The huge parties outgrow themselves because they attract students aimlessly walking through the neighborhood, looking for something to do.

Mrs. Hardy said Georgetown students have even knocked over neighborhood traffic signs and painted obsolete emergency call boxes their school colors - blue and gray.

Mrs. Schaffner often has complained about a house with six Georgetown seniors on Reservoir Road that has kept her awake at night with loud parties. …

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