Clinton Rapped on Human Rights: Abuses in Africa, Middle East Called Foreign Policy `Blind Spots'

By Sieff, Martin | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 4, 1998 | Go to article overview

Clinton Rapped on Human Rights: Abuses in Africa, Middle East Called Foreign Policy `Blind Spots'


Sieff, Martin, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


A leading international human rights organization criticized the Clinton administration yesterday for turning a blind eye to human rights abuses in large areas of the world over the past year.

Human Rights Watch Executive Director Kenneth Roth told reporters, "We call on the Clinton administration to carry out enforcement of human rights around the world."

"The Clinton administration's efforts to promote human rights around the world were subject to large blind spots," the organization said in its 1999 report. "Major parts of Africa, the Middle East and the former Soviet Union never made it to the administration's human rights agenda."

"Ironically, in light of its long-stated commitment to upholding human rights at home and in its foreign policy, the U.S. government today poses a threat to the universality of human rights," the report said. ". . . Human rights concerns rarely ranked with the administration's other interests."

The New York-based body is the largest U.S. human rights organization. Its 506-page report described human rights conditions in 68 countries, which represents 70 percent of the global population. It also analyzed U.S., European and U.N. responses to those abuses.

Mr. Roth appeared to take for granted that the United States should act as the moral policeman and arbiter of human rights around the world. He attacked the U.S. government for failing to sufficiently condemn abuses, including genocide, in other countries.

He joined the chorus of human rights critics attacking the administration for not taking more energetic action to support the extradition of former Chilean dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet from Britain to Spain, where he faces charges of genocide, terrorism and torture.

"Pinochet's arrest makes a very nice 50th anniversary present," for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which will mark its birthday Dec. 10, Mr. Roth said.

The Human Rights Watch report condemned U.S. opposition to treaties that would ban land mines, prohibit military conscription of anyone younger than 18 and set up an International Court of Justice.

Mr. Roth said in an introduction to the report that governments could no longer ignore criticism of their human rights records, as they did 50 years ago.

But the report also documented a pattern of governments around the world continuing to carry out genocidal massacres, systematic intimidation and torture and denial of basic democratic freedoms on their populations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clinton Rapped on Human Rights: Abuses in Africa, Middle East Called Foreign Policy `Blind Spots'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.