Impeachment Debate Resumes

By Roman, Nancy E.; Murray, Frank J. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 18, 1998 | Go to article overview

Impeachment Debate Resumes


Roman, Nancy E., Murray, Frank J., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The House of Representatives will meet at 9 this morning to consider the impeachment of President Clinton after a second day that closed with a dramatic bombshell.

After House Democrats lost a battle late last night to put off the impeachment debate indefinitely, a Capitol Hill newspaper posted an article on its Internet site reporting that Speaker-elect Robert L. Livingston "has had sexual affairs in his past and will offer to resign."

A late-evening meeting of the House Republican Conference concluded with an announcement that Mr. Livingston, contrary to the report in the weekly Roll Call, did not offer to step down as speaker-elect and has no intention of doing so.

"I will not be intimidated," he said.

The revelation did not change the vote of moderate Republicans, several more of whom announced yesterday they will support impeachment. The announcements make it mathematically all but impossible for the president to avoid being impeached.

The Livingston disclosure followed the harshest words yet from the incoming speaker, who spoke passionately on the House floor in support of opening the impeachment debate, delayed after Mr. Clinton began bombing Iraq.

"Let us not prolong the harm to the country by hanging this issue out in this body," Mr. Livingston said. "It allows us to face the issue head on. If it is meritorious it will pass. If not, it will fail."

It was not clear last night how long debate will last, or when the final votes will be taken.

Republican House leaders were hoping to extend the debate beyond the one hour allowed for a privileged resolution under House rules. They met last night to review rules and procedures; Democrats will meet this morning to do the same.

During a contentious floor debate yesterday on whether to proceed with the impeachment debate, Democrats seized on the military action in the Persian Gulf as reason to hold off until at least next week.

"We must think not only of how this activity will be received by members or other Americans around the country," said House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt. "We believe we've got to also look at how Saddam Hussein will perceive the idea and the information that, while he is under physical attack by the United States and its people, we are having a debate in our House of Representatives to remove the commander in chief from his office."

But Mr. Livingston and others noted that the House moved to impeach President Nixon while the Vietnam War was under way.

Rep. Tillie Fowler, Florida Republican and vice chairman of the Republican conference, said that when Mr. Clinton and Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen were asked yesterday whether a vote on impeachment would undercut his authority, they each answered "no."

"Both the president and the secretary of defense are saying it does not undermine their authority," she said. "It's time we move forward."

Several Republican military veterans said impeachment would have no bearing on troop morale.

"Our fighting men are fighting for our constitutional privilege," said Rep. Sam Johnson, who spent seven years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. Mr. Johnson said if Congress had not continued its operations - providing for the troops - "I probably wouldn't be here today."

Duncan Hunter, California Republican and another Vietnam veteran, said he has concluded that "If we hold up this process as a result of the strikes that are going on, the troops will feel they've been used for political purposes. And then they will be demoralized."

Democrats - most of whom, like most Republicans, have never served in the military - argued that voting to impeach Mr. Clinton would be perceived as a vote of no confidence in Operation Desert Fox.

"It makes no sense to go forward when our young men and women are under arms," said House Minority Whip David E. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Impeachment Debate Resumes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.